GSA gains traction

first_imgWhile most Notre Dame students left campus and their extracurricular pursuits for the summer, members of the Progressive Student Alliance’s (PSA) 4 to 5 Movement and AllianceND have worked to maintain the momentum their groups gained late last semester in their advocacy on behalf of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community on campus. That momentum peaked when the University deferred its May decision on the approval of AllianceND, a student gay-straight alliance, as an officially recognized club until early in the fall 2012 semester, according to the group’s deferral letter from Peggy Hnatusko, director of student activities for programming. The coalition’s summer efforts included asking members of the extended Notre Dame family – students, families, friends – to share their personal accounts of why a gay-straight alliance is important to the University and its students in particular, junior PSA co-president Alex Coccia said. [Editor’s Note: Coccia is a columnist for The Observer]. “Part of what we stressed at the end of the semester when the decision came out was including student voices in this review, so we asked people to write in their personal responses through channels like Facebook and our website,” he said. “We’ve gotten 190 responses, all well-written, some of which are very short or very long, include personal stories or draw on experiences at Notre Dame.” Coccia said several responses focus on Notre Dame’s mission as a place where “learning becomes service to justice,” as well as principles of theology. The group plans to give the collected responses to Vice President for Student Affairs Erin Hoffmann Harding. Sophomore Lauren Morisseau, PSA co-president, said the written responses convey widespread support for the LGBT community at Notre Dame and its goals for the future. “It’s amazing to read through names I’ve never seen before, and it shows the breadth of how far this [movement] has reached and the connection it’s made to students,” she said. Additionally, the coalition received input from outside the Notre Dame community, Coccia said. “People at other Catholic universities wrote in to talk about their experiences and the good gay-straight alliances have done for them there,” he said. “Boston College also reached out to us on Twitter, and a few other universities have joined our coalition and expressed their support, so that’s been great.” Morisseau said that display of outside support demonstrates camaraderie between college students around the country. “Sometimes there’s rivalry between colleges, but over this, there’s really no rivalry,” she said. “They want the best for us, and that’s a beautiful thing.” Within the Notre Dame community, the 4 to 5 Movement has a “greater calling” than simply achieving club recognition for AllianceND, Coccia said. “[Getting AllianceND recognized] is a substantial part of what we’re aiming for, but it has a greater calling to make change to the student body environment,” he said. “I think we reached a real high point last semester, so as we continue with semester activities, we will always aim to create a more welcoming, inclusive environment.” Coccia said the coalition’s primary focus at the moment is updating freshmen and new students about the current situation on campus through several media. “It’s refreshing to know that many freshmen already know about [the 4 to 5 Movement] unsolicited, and student initiative has been very high just in the first weekend with people taking it upon themselves to make the experience for freshmen in Frosh-O, dorm life and club life more inclusive on campus,” Coccia said. Senior AllianceND officer Karl Abad said he hopes to see the enthusiasm continue. “We have to keep the momentum up going into the semester,” Abad said. “All the fame and publicity the 4 to 5 Movement has gotten has been amazing for getting the message out there that something has to be done and something has to change here.” Morisseau said the success of the 4 to 5 Movement so far has sparked dialogue among members of the Notre Dame community. “Even the general conversation has a different vibe. When I came here last fall, nobody talked casually about issues of gender, gender identity or sexual orientation,” Morisseau said. “It’s interesting to see friends come back and all of a sudden want to talk about [LGBT inclusion] more after having something broaden their view over summer. People are casually talking about this, and it’s kind of a mainstream topic, which is amazing.” Another way the campus environment has  changed is the creation of the Core Room in the LaFortune Student Center, which serves as a space for members of Core Council and allies to come together, Abad said. “We really needed a physical space. The [Core Council] was really ambiguous before and no one really knew exactly what it was,” he said. “Now we have the opportunity to reconstruct it, so it’s very important to keep pressure on the administration for them to act and think about it.” Over the past year, the Core Council underwent some major changes in leadership when Sr. Sue Dunn, former assistant vice president for student affairs, left her position at the University. In doing so, Dunn left Core Council without a co-chair from the administration. Former vice president for student affairs Fr. Tom Doyle’s departure from his position also shook up the Council’s operations, Abad said. “Because the structure for Core Council was so deconstructed and dismantled last semester, it was confusing on one hand,” he said. “But at the same time, I think it instigated a spark in the administration, so maybe this is a time to look things over for review and see what things can be changed.” While the Core Council succeeds in terms of administration and programming, Abad said the organization has also been used as a limitation in the approval process for AllianceND. “We’ve been told we already have the Core Council, so why would we need AllianceND as well?” he said. “What should we be doing about Core Council if we want AllianceND to be approved at the same time? We need to figure out what we want.” Abad said the proposed AllianceND would help bridge the LGBT and ally communities at Notre Dame in an inclusive environment. “AllianceND would provide a sense of community which I feel is very lacking. You can come to Coffee in CoMo every few weeks, but it doesn’t feel like a community you can go back to,” he said. “It would provide a safe, welcoming environment where people can meet and learn about what they’re going through.” Abad said the proposed club aligns with Christian beliefs, especially in terms of its service component, which would include outreach to local high schools and LGBT centers. “We are planning to be very involved in the Michiana community,” he said. “Notre Dame is meant to be helpful, enlightening and loving, so we need to make it pertinent that AllianceND is necessary because at the moment, the LGBT community doesn’t have those resources it needs to feel like it’s getting the same treatment.” Although the coalition is remaining “cautiously optimistic” about the upcoming approval decision, Abad said this time feels different from before due to support from all corners of the Notre Dame community. “Before, it was just the gay community alone voicing its concerns, but I feel like the ally voice is a lot more important in this movement because it’s not directly affecting them per se,” he said. “The fact that straight students are very concerned about this issue should bring up red flags for the University.”   More information about the 4 to 5 Movement and AllianceND, including the latter’s proposed constitution, can be found on the 4 to 5 Movement Facebook page.last_img read more

Flower shop preps for holiday

first_imgValentine’s Day is right around the corner, but the student managers at Irish Gardens have been preparing for the flower-heavy holiday for more than two months. Planning for the busiest business week of the year for the completely student-run, independent floral shop began in December, general manager Krystal Hentges said. On an average business day, Irish Gardens places approximately $100 in flower orders, but Hentges said that figure jumps to nearly $1,000 per day during the Valentine’s Day boom. “First, we evaluate sales from the previous year and come up with a fun slogan,” Hentges said. “I placed our flower product order in January.” Hentges said this year’s slogan is “You can’t escape puppy love,” and the annual flower shipment, which includes some new floral arrangement offerings, arrived Monday at its location in the basement of the LaFortune Student Center. “This year, I wanted to mix up the bouquets we have offered in previous years and one I’m really excited about has lilies and hydrangeas,” Hentges said. But the delivery of 38 boxes of flowers only marks the beginning of the hectic days leading up to Feb. 14, she said. “Amidst boys coming in to place last-minute orders, we spend the next two days processing the flowers,” Hentges said. “We get them out of the … boxes they come in, clip them, get them in water and organize them.” Hentges said Valentine’s Day festivities really begin today when the Irish Gardens staff spends hours making all the preordered flower arrangements for distribution Thursday. “Last year, we worked from 10 [a.m.] until 9 [p.m.] making all the arrangements,” she said. “It’s a lot of work, but it is so much fun.” On the day of the holiday, Hentges said the store is busy with deliveries, pickups and last-minute orders. Despite the chaos, Hentges said the staff’s hard work results in beautiful final products. “It is amazing to see some of the work that comes out of the shop. It is so gorgeous,” she said. “It does not even feel like I am working when I am the shop, because it is such a fun and creative outlet.” Hentges said Irish Gardens staff members enjoy working during the busy holiday season, even if it means longer hours in the shop. “It’s the one time of the year that everyone is in the shop, and it is a big bonding experience,” she said. “It is a huge learning experience for the staff. It’s awesome to see everyone improve so drastically and becomes more confident in their ability.” Senior employee Katie Melloh said her first Valentine’s season in the shop has been busier than expected. “I was abroad last spring. I wasn’t quite sure what to expect, but I haven’t had a free moment the past two days while at work,” she said. “It’s been really crazy, but a lot of fun.” More than the personal satisfaction the staff draws from working during Valentine’s Day, Hentges said helping students celebrate the holiday with flowers makes all the work worth it. “I can never decide which part of working at Irish Gardens is my favorite, helping the customers or making the arrangements. It’s so fun to help guys find that perfect arrangement. … It’s a process because most guys come in completely clueless,” Hentges said. “Once they come to a decision, it really is exciting when they feel confident in their choice and hopefully aren’t scared of coming in anymore.” Irish Gardens will be open today until 7 p.m. and will open for business Thursday from 11 a.m. until 7 p.m. while supplies last. For more information on pricing and Valentine’s Day specials, visit flowershop.nd.edu. Contact Katie McCarty at kmccar16@nd.edulast_img read more

Campus-wide Stations provide Lenten reflection

first_imgIn a public display of devotion, students and faculty traversed campus last night to participate in the annual campus-wide Stations of the Cross.Assistant director of undergraduate ministry Kate Barrett said if students have not previously participated in Stations as part of their Lenten experience, the event provides the opportunity to see “one of the oldest and most treasured ways that we as a Church throughout the world enter into Jesus’ passion.”“Even if they have grown up participating in the Stations of the Cross in their home parishes, this is a unique way to celebrate the holiest week of the Church year,” she said.According to Barrett, the event began 20 years ago through the efforts of Notre Dame Folk Choir director Steve Warner and Fr. Tom McDermott.In recent years, Barrett said most of the planning starts in the winter and involves getting as many people as possible involved as readers, cross-bearers and musicians.“The Glee Club, the Chorale and groups of trumpet players from the Notre Dame Band all help provide music along with the Folk Choir,” she said. “Typically groups of students from many halls, led by the hall liturgical or spiritual commissioners, take on the responsibility of ‘sponsoring’ the various stops along the way – so they find the readers and cross-bearers for each station.”Reflections for the event are written by Holy Cross priests Kevin Grove and Drew Gawrych, Barrett said.“[The reflections] are beautiful and give us a great connection to the spirituality of our founding religious community,” she said.Over the years, Barrett said students have visited residence halls including Sorin and Lyons, academic buildings such as Bond Hall and campus landmarks such as the reflecting pool at the Hesburgh Library.“Even when it’s really cold out, like this year, the experience is well worth it,” she said. “They may never have the opportunity again to participate with such a large group of people.”Senior Maria Corsaro said she attended the Stations of the Cross event the past two years.“I go to this event year after year because I think it’s a good way to connect with my faith and to remind myself of Jesus’s journey on Easter,” she said. “I think that sometimes we forget just how much Jesus went through on Easter for all of us.“The campus-wide Stations of the Cross helps me to remember everything that Jesus suffered through. I really like the feeling of being a part of the large community of people on this journey around campus.”Corsaro said her favorite part of the experience is the sense of community that accompanies the journey around campus with a large group of people.“I love the sense of community that comes from so many people being together like this,” she said. “With students and families from South Bend, I really feel that everyone comes together for this event.”Even after the Easter season, Corsaro said she continues to associate different areas on campus with the Station of the Cross she saw there.“I think that this is something special and unique to this event,” she said.Junior Katelyn Virga said she decided to partake in the campus-wide event for the first time this year.“Stations of the Cross is a powerful way to honor the passion of Jesus,” she said. “It reminds us of Jesus’s sacrifice in a very tangible way, and it provides us with an excellent opportunity to reflect on the season.”Virga said she would absolutely recommend the event to other students.“Stations of the Cross is a moving way to celebrate your faith with others, and to ‘walk with Jesus’ in an almost literal sense,” she said. “Notre Dame is a great place to grow in faith, and Stations of the Cross is a unique way to do that.”Tags: Easter Season, Lent, Stations of the Crosslast_img read more

Senate hears presentation on study abroad changes

first_imgStudent senators received a presentation from Tom Guinan, associate vice president for administrative operations for Notre Dame International, and junior Frank Wamsley regarding the policy change on overseas flights for students in study abroad programs this Wednesday. Previously, airfare was covered by the University; starting with the 2016-2017 school year, students who are studying abroad will be responsible for the costs of their flights. “We had a change in study abroad policy, mainly the financial aspect of it, that was announced over the summer and will go into effect next academic year,” Guinan said. “People have been surprised in the past that they didn’t have to pay for their airfare, but Notre Dame has had a long-standing policy that airfare would be covered.”Guinan said that by having students pay for their tickets, the University will be able to send up to 50 more students abroad each year. He also said this is just the first effort by Notre Dame International to increase participation in study abroad programs. “We’ve seen a disturbing declining trend in our ability to send students abroad, mainly due to rising costs for overseas institutions,” Guinan said. “About 10 years ago, we’d send 800, 850 students abroad. Last year, we only sent 690, and the numbers are just going down by 15 to 20 students a year.”According to Guinan, Notre Dame International decided it was “unacceptable and appalling” that so many students were being turned down for study abroad. “Every student who applies is qualified to go, we just didn’t have the resources to send all the students abroad that we wanted to,” Guinan said. “Our goal is to send between 85 and 90 percent of students who apply abroad.”Pangborn Hall senator Taylor Still said in an email that despite concerns about the new costs, she is pleased Notre Dame International is working to expand the program.“While the immediate cost incurred by students is inconvenient and unwarranted, the decision is coming from a well-intentioned place,” she said. “Especially as Notre Dame International expansion efforts proceed, I am more excited that a greater number of students will have this opportunity.”Students who are receiving financial aid will be given help in purchasing the tickets. According to Guinan, the same percentage of tuition that is covered by the University will also be given to buy a plane ticket. “That was the key consideration before we implemented this policy,” Guinan said. “We didn’t want to exclude students who otherwise wouldn’t be able to afford the airfare, and those on financial aid will have access to the programs in the same way they had before.” Student senate meets every Wednesday at 6 p.m. in the Notre Dame room of LaFortune Student Center. All meetings are open to the public.Tags: Student government, student senate, study abroadlast_img read more

Students react to Ginsburg talk

first_imgJunior Janet Stengle walked down the aisle in Purcell Pavilion to a microphone in the middle of the floor. More than 7,000 people watched as she looked U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in the eye and asked a question.“Does a Supreme Court justice have a role as a public figure, and if so, how would you define that role?”Ginsburg smiled and started talking, describing the responsibility she feels she and the other Supreme Court justices have to stay engage with the public and help others understand what’s going on at a given point in time.“I felt like I was legitimately having a conversation with her,” Stengle said. “When we stood up, she made sure she was looking right at us and speaking to us directly, and that was a really cool experience.”Students and members of the South Bend community lined up outside Purcell Pavilion on Monday afternoon to hear Ginsburg speak at the interview-style event sponsored by the Office of the President, Notre Dame Law School and Notre Dame Student Government. Entrance was free but limited to those who reserved tickets beforehand.Many came simply for the political engagement.“I just love politics, and I want to learn more about it,” freshman Colin Brankin said. “I’m very interested to hear a Supreme Court justice talk — especially one that’s as notable and as possibly controversial as she is.”Others came for more personal reasons.“Ruth Bader Ginsburg is my hero,” senior Abigayle Rhode-Pausina said. “She is everything I want to be when I grow up.”Ginsburg garnered a large turnout from the student body, which is noteworthy in itself, senior Sheryl Cherian said.“She’s an inspiring human that makes policy accessible, and I feel like that has everything to do with all the youth coming out,” she said.Stengle said she hopes to go to law school some day. She and the other students selected to ask questions at the event got to meet Ginsburg at a reception afterwards.“I liked her point when she explained that the court doesn’t make change, people make change,” Stengle said. “I liked how she cleared that up — how they don’t have a set agenda, that they just do what comes at them.”Students said they were surprised, at points, by Ginsburg — like when she whipped out a pocket-sized version of the Constitution or joked about her “notorious” nickname.“She was sassier than I was expecting,” senior Leah Jacob said.“And my favorite part was 100 percent when she said there would be enough women on the Supreme Court when there were nine,” senior Holly Backstrom added.Though junior Will Lederer found Ginsburg’s personal history interesting, he said he would have liked to hear a little more about how she formulates and delivers opinions in Supreme Court cases. “I’m a conservative, a pretty staunch conservative,” he said. “And I think it’s pretty important to hear the other sides of arguments.”Senior Paul Rudnicki said he thinks the chance to see any Supreme Court justice speak is one worth taking.“The Supreme Court is a major force shaping some of the most important issues — like immigration, energy policy, voting laws,” he said. “And Ruth Bader Ginsburg has been a prominent member for many years.”This is the second consecutive year a Supreme Court justice visited campus — Justice Sonia Sotomayor spoke at DeBartolo Performing Arts Center in 2015.Rhode-Pausina said she enjoyed having the event in Purcell Pavillion; she wasn’t able to get tickets to the Sotomayor event last fall.Inviting big names like Ginsburg and Sotomayor to campus reflects well on the University, Lederer said. “For her to accept our invitation here is very impressive. I mean, she had to go pretty far out of her way. She had to make time to come here,” he said. “That’s very impressive for Notre Dame as a community.”Perhaps a new tradition is forming.“I’d love to see [Justice] Clarence Thomas next year or [Chief Justice] John Roberts in future years, if we’re going to continue this trend,” Lederer said.Tags: fr. jenkins, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Supreme Court, U.S. Supreme Courtlast_img read more

Positive COVID-19 Tests Recorded In Chautauqua County Schools

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window),Where’s the other 2 positive cases at? Pexels / Pixabay Stock Image.UPDATE: There are no positive COVID cases in the Dunkirk public schools, as previously reported, according to the District’s Superintendent.Dunkirk City School District Superintendent Michael Mansfield said in a social media post that human error caused two positive test reports, but the actual number of infections remains at zero as of Wednesday afternoon.Mansfield apologized for any concerns the accidental report may have caused and is taking measures to make sure the mistake is not repeated. ORIGINAL:JAMESTOWN — Two Chautauqua County school districts have reported through the state COVID-19 report card they have four positive cases among students or those close to students.The Jamestown Public School District has been notified by the Chautauqua County Department of Health that two members of the Jamestown community have tested positive for COVID-19. Two more cases were confirmed for School 7 in Dunkirk.Jamestown reported the positive tests are for two sibling students who attend by distance learning only, and have not been physically present at Jamestown High School.“We appreciate our community’s efforts to work together to keep our students and staff safe by wearing face masks, maintaining social distancing and continuing frequent hand washing while on any school property,” said JPS Superintendent Dr. Kevin Whitaker. “The health and safety of our school community remains our number one priority.”Students or staff that exhibit possible COVID-19 symptoms are asked to contact their health provider and stay home from school.  Possible symptoms include  fever over 100 F, chills, cough, shortness of breath, difficulty breathing, muscle aches, vomiting or diarrhea, or loss of taste or smell.No other information was available regarding the Dunkirk positive test results.last_img read more

Testing Replaces Tailgating, As Bills Set To Welcome In Fans

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window),Guess who’s NOT going to the game….??? CuomoPetition was created to BAN him ….. The people ALWAYS win File image by Idibri / CC BY 2.0 ORCHARD PARK (AP) — Testing is replacing tailgating in the Bills Stadium parking lot, with a limited number of fans being allowed to attend Buffalo’s wild-card playoff game against the Indianapolis Colts on Saturday.Before that can happen, New York state guidelines require the approximate 6,700 fans plus another 200 employees and members of the media first test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours of kickoff. Each person must show their ID and proof of a negative test before being allowed in the outdoor facility, which seats about 70,000.The tests will be held Wednesday and Thursday, and conducted by New Jersey-based BioReference Laboratories.The company is converting a portion of the expansive stadium lots into a drive-thru testing site. Tests will be done over 14-hour periods both days, feature 30 lanes to accommodate the number of people showing up, and have the results returned within close to a 24-hour period. “We have approximately 150 staff who are in Buffalo to pull this thing off, who were arriving Saturday, Sunday, training and getting everything set up and ready to go,” BioReference executive chairman Jon Cohen said Tuesday.Though the company has conducted more than 10 million COVID-19 tests since May, including NFL and NBA players and staff, this will be BioReference’s largest drive-thru event and the first mandatory fan-testing program in the country, Cohen said.The state considers the program a test run in granting the Bills permission to have fans attend a home game for the first time this season. Should all go well, the program has the potential of being used in opening other New York venues, such as indoor sports arenas, music halls and even Broadway theaters.“Everybody’s focused on what should be the game and the fans and everything, but this is also focused on how testing programs like this help re-open the New York State economy. That’s a very important issue,” Cohen said. “So it’s a broader brush than it just happens to be a sports event.”Though a Bills’ win would guarantee them playing at home again the following week, there have been no discussions as to whether fans would be allowed to attend a second game, Cohen said.“Everybody’s totally focused on getting the job done at hand, and then we’ll figure out if there’s going to be next steps,” Cohen said.In Buffalo, there’s relief that members of the so-called “Bills Mafia” can finally see their AFC East champions in action up close. It will also be Buffalo’s first home playoff appearance since a 30-27 loss to Jacksonville on Dec. 28, 1996, in what proved to be Bills’ Hall of Fame quarterback Jim Kelly’s final game.Not surprisingly, the limited number of tickets sold out shortly after being made available on Thursday.“It’s goose-bump material,” long-time season-ticket holder Barbara Babiarz told Rochester’s WHEC-TV after landing two tickets. “I mean just the thought of being part of this playoff game as a fan when I couldn’t go at all for the whole season I just, there are no words to describe it.”Gov. Andrew Cuomo said he also plans to attend, while stressing fans be safe by wearing facemasks, maintaining social distancing in the stands, and while entering and exiting the stadium.Receiver Stefon Diggs, acquired in a trade with Minnesota in March, was already amazed by how many fans turned out in the early hours of Dec. 20 to greet the team at the airport after Buffalo clinched its first division title in 25 years following a 48-19 win at Denver.“I got a little bit of a taste of it,” Diggs said. “I really look forward to it because we haven’t had fans all year, and that’s something that we can try to take advantage of in the postseason. I try not to think too far ahead right now, but I’ve kind of been focused on this.”last_img read more

Idina Menzel, Josh Gad & More Are Back in Frozen Fever Trailer

first_imgLook who’s back! Frozen’s Anna, Elsa, Olaf, Kristoff, and yes, even Sven, will return to the big screen in Frozen Fever, the new animated short that will play in movie theaters before the live action Cinderella beginning March 13. Kristen Bell, Idina Menzel, Josh Gad and Jonathan Groff lend their voices yet again to make our dreary winter a little more cheery. Have a look below as Olaf adds his own personal touch to Anna’s birthday cake, Elsa works her ice magic on the decorations, and, uh, some sort of steam room situation (again). If that weren’t enough, the sneak peek also includes a taste of the new song penned by Oscar-winning duo Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez! Idina Menzel View Commentscenter_img Star Fileslast_img

Finding Neverland Will Release a Cast Recording

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 21, 2016 View Comments Related Shows Ready to have your world turned upside down? The Broadway musical Finding Neverland will record a cast album! The Republic Records albums will drop on June 23, with Matthew Morrison, Kelsey Grammer, Laura Michelle Kelly and company singing such Gary Barlow and Elliot Kennedy tunes as “Believe,” “All That Matters,” “Stronger” and “When Your Feet Don’t Touch the Ground”The cast album, which was recorded on May 4, will be the second release the Neverland believers will be able to get their hands on. The previously reported concept album hits stores and online on April 21. The concept recording features new takes on the score by the likes of Jennifer Lopez, Nick Jonas, Jon Bon Jovi and more.Directed by Diane Paulus and featuring a score by Barlow and Kennedy and a book by James Graham, Finding Neverland follows the story of J.M. Barrie (Morrison) and his relationship with the family of widow Sylvia Llewelyn Davies (Kelly). Llewelyn Davies’ children eventually became Barrie’s inspiration to write Peter Pan.In addition to Morrison, Grammer and Kelly, the original cast includes Carolee Carmello, Teal Wicks, Alex Dreier, Hayden Signoretti, Noah Hinsdale, Hayden Signoretti, Christopher Paul Richards, Sawyer Nunes, Jackson Demott Hill and Aidan Gemme. Finding Neverlandlast_img read more

Annie Baker & More Tapped for Signature Theatre’s 2016-17 Season

first_imgAnnie Baker(Photo: Bruce Glikas) Works from Pulitzer winner Annie Baker, Branden Jacobs-Jenkins, Will Eno and more have been slated for Signature Theatre’s 2016-17 season. The productions will all play at off-Broadway’s Pershing Square Signature Center.Baker’s The Antipodes is one of a trio of world premieres scheduled. Directed by Lila Neugebauer, the production will begin on April 4, 2017. Meanwhile, Jacobs-Jenkins’ Everybody, a modern riff on one of the oldest plays in the English language, is set to bow for the first time on January 31, 2017, also helmed by Neugebauer. Eno’s A New Play will make its debut on February 7, 2017.Other shows joining the lineup include “Master Harold” … and the boys, written and directed by Athol Fugard, which will begin on October 18 as part of the Legacy program. In a small tea shop in South Africa, two black men and a young white boy joke and dance together, defying the brutalities of apartheid through their joyous love. But festering issues of family, race, and power are not so easy to ignore, and a single phone call can trigger catastrophe.As previously announced, Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Suzan-Lori Parks is the 2016-17 Residency One playwright: productions attached to her tenure include The Death of the Last Black Man in the Whole Entire World, Venus and The Red Letter Plays: In the Blood and Fucking A. View Commentslast_img read more