Watch out for the sleazy politicians

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion I have to point out what power in some people’s hands will do to destroy others and the nation. D.C. politicians have set up slush funds for secret payoffs, committees of phony Russian collusion and sexual abuse by both genders. Locally, we have the governor giving away free college education in-state. Gov. Andrew Cuomo is one of worst, if not the worst, governors in the state’s history.Then we have everyday people with little titles that go to their heads. They scheme and lie to make themselves look good to their bosses, no matter what the cost or consequence to others. We should look very closely at those who crow the loudest and why. Think about it.Al MarvellScotia More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusSchenectady teens accused of Scotia auto theft, chase; Ended in Clifton Park crash, Saratoga Sheriff…EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationlast_img read more

Climate change is a worldwide problem

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionYes, this winter is brutal. Yes, it’s really cold. But Alaska is enjoying very warm weather. Anchorage Alaska saw an official high of 44 degrees Tuesday [Jan. 2]. Yes, Alaska was warmer than we were. Preliminary statistics indicate that 2017 will be one of the warmest on record.When we talk of global warming, we aren’t talking about just New York, or just the Northeast, or even the continental United States. Global warming is the whole Earth, not a small piece of it where we live.This is the only planet we have. What happens in Africa has an effect on us. What happens in Asia impacts us. Let’s start thinking globally people.Edward F. Wagner Clifton ParkMore from The Daily Gazette:Game 7: Shenendehowa grad and Braves rookie Ian Anderson gets start with World Series spot on the li…Controversial solar project goes before Clifton Park Planning BoardEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesHigh-risk COVID exposure reported in Clifton Parklast_img read more

Rights of passage

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Manchester retail: Bold Trafford

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London residential portfolio drives Grosvenor profits up

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Dorchester stores up its charm

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Frustrated King to sell off Creston portfolio

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Making cities last

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WHO raises global virus risk to maximum level

first_imgChina hopeStill, signs in China offered hope that the outbreak could be contained.China reported 44 more deaths on Friday, raising its toll to 2,788, with 327 new cases — the lowest daily figure for new infections in more than a month.The virus has mostly killed the elderly or people with pre-existing health conditions.South Korea also now has the most cases outside China, with more than 2,000 infections and 13 deaths.The virus has had wide-ranging impact, even forcing K-pop megastars BTS to cancel four Seoul concerts scheduled for April. But it is its rapid spread to new zones that has authorities concerned — in the past 24 hours, it has affected nine new countries, from Azerbaijan to Mexico to New Zealand.”We have now increased our assessment of the risk of spread and the risk of impact of COVID-19 to very high at global level,” WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus told reporters.”We do not see evidence as yet that the virus is spreading freely in communities. As long as that’s the case, we still have a chance of containing this virus.”Global investors nevertheless ran scared, with world markets suffering their worst week since the 2008 financial crisis. British cruise ship passenger diesIn Japan, the health ministry said a British man who was on board a coronavirus-stricken cruise ship quarantined near Tokyo had died. More than 700 others on the ship have tested positive.The governor of Japan’s rural northern island of Hokkaido urged people to stay at home this weekend in a desperate effort to contain the outbreak.In Europe, the largest epicenter is Italy with 650 cases and 17 deaths — mostly in cities in the north.Wide-ranging measures to halt the spread of the virus have affected tens of millions of people in northern Italy, with schools closed and cultural and sporting events cancelled.Experts said the virus had probably “circulated unnoticed for several weeks” before the first confirmed cases — possibly since January. Schools closed, events cancelled The coronavirus crisis is affecting everything from global production to schools to sporting events, with FIFA warning Friday that international football matches could be postponed.Several companies have said they expect the virus to hit their earnings because of weaker demand.Oil prices also slipped again, with Brent oil for April delivery sinking as low as $50.05 a barrel.Analysts have warned that China, the world’s second-largest economy, will see a major cut in growth this quarter as the country remains largely paralyzed by quarantines and containment measures. The chair of the US Federal Reserve, Jerome Powell, said the central bank stood at the ready to intervene if needed, given the “evolving” risks to the world’s largest economy posed by the deadly outbreak.New drastic measures were put in place: Switzerland cancelled all gatherings of more than 1,000 people, and Saudi Arabia banned Gulf citizens from its holy cities of Mecca and Medina.”This is not a time for panic. It is time to be prepared — fully prepared,” UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said.center_img Topics : ‘Struggling with containment’ Those efforts come as the number of deaths and new infections has been tapering off in China, following unprecedented quarantine efforts locking down tens of millions of people in the worst-hit cities. But infections elsewhere have started to surge, with Iran, Italy and South Korea becoming the major new hotspots and cases being confirmed in around 50 countries.”We see a number of countries struggling with containment,” said Michael Ryan, head of the WHO’s health emergencies program.The WHO has voiced particular concern about Africa’s preparedness, warning that the continent’s health care systems were ill-equipped to respond to a COVID-19 epidemic.Cases had previously been reported in Egypt and Algeria, but not in the sub-Saharan region until Friday when Nigeria reported its first case: an Italian man in densely populated Lagos.In Iran, unnamed health system sources told the BBC that at least 210 people had died of the coronavirus — far beyond the official death toll of 34, but a health ministry spokesman angrily denied that figure. The World Health Organization on Friday raised its global risk assessment of the new coronavirus to its highest level after the epidemic spread to sub-Saharan Africa and financial markets slumped.The virus has proliferated around the globe over the past week, emerging on every continent except Antarctica, prompting many governments and businesses to try to stop people from travelling or gathering in crowded places.It has killed more than 2,800 people and infected over 84,000 worldwide — the vast majority in China — since it emerged apparently from an animal market in the central Chinese city of Wuhan in late December.last_img read more

China warns of racism in Australia, issues travel warning as row escalates

first_imgSince Australian borders are closed to all non-essential inbound and outbound travellers because of the pandemic — with no date set for them to reopen — the advice from Beijing is largely symbolic.Australian Trade Minister Simon Birmingham told the ABC’s Radio National on Monday that there had been racist incidents.”But I think the idea that Australia, in any way, is an unsafe destination for visitors to come to is one that just does not stand up to scrutiny,” he said.The anti-discrimination commission in New South Wales — Australia’s most populous state — said last week that there had been an increase in enquiries related to the pandemic and racism against people of Asian backgrounds.The group said instances included people being bullied for wearing a face mask, spat at and harassed in public on their way to work, while they exercised or at the supermarket.Anti-Discrimination NSW said it had also heard from people who have experienced violent race-related acts like their car window being smashed and racist language written across cars and private property.The relationship between Beijing and Canberra has become increasingly troubled as China has become more assertive in flexing its growing military, economic and diplomatic power in the Asia-Pacific region.In response to calls for an independent inquiry into the origins of the pandemic, the Chinese ambassador in Canberra had threatened a widespread consumer boycott of Australian products — a warning followed up by a bar on imports from four major Australian beef producers.And then in May, China imposed an 80 percent tariff on Australian barley over dumping allegations, a move set to cost at least Aus$500 million (US$350 million) a year, according to five of the nation’s grain growers.An editorial published by the nationalist Chinese state-run Global Times warned the travel alert “may just be the tip of the iceberg”.”If Australia wants to retain the gain from its economic ties with China,” it said, “it must make a real change to its current stance on China, or it will completely lose the benefits of Chinese consumers.” China stepped up the war of words again last week by telling its citizens to avoid the country altogether over safety concerns.”Recently, there has been a lot of discrimination against Chinese and Asian people in Australia,” said foreign ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying at a regular press briefing Monday.”Many Chinese in Australia have been insulted or even injured…[and] graffiti or words with racist connotations against Chinese have appeared in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and other Australian cities.”On Friday, China’s culture and tourism ministry had advised against travel to Australia due to increasing racism linked to the coronavirus. Topics :center_img Beijing warned Monday there has been “a lot of discrimination” against Chinese people in Australia, escalating a diplomatic row just days after telling its citizens not to travel there.Tensions between Australia and China have been mounting on a number of fronts, and Beijing reacted with fury to recent calls for an independent investigation into the origins and spread of the coronavirus pandemic after it first emerged in central China late last year.Read also: Australia, China tensions rise over coronavirus inquiry calllast_img read more