10 months agoDONE DEAL: Wolves winger Jordan Graham joins Oxford

first_imgDONE DEAL: Wolves winger Jordan Graham joins Oxfordby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveWolves winger Jordan Graham will join Oxford United on loan in January until the end of the season.Graham, 23, was due to be on loan at Ipswich Town for the entire campaign but that agreement was cut short.The former Aston Villa man spent time on loan at Oxford in 2015 and will return to the League One club when the transfer window opens.”I feel so happy to be back and it’s a pleasure to come back,” Graham said in a video on social media. TagsTransfersLoan MarketAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img

10 months agoChelsea boss Sarri pleased with matchwinner Kante: He’s improving

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Chelsea boss Sarri pleased with matchwinner Kante: He’s improvingby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea boss Maurizio Sarri was delighted with matchwinner N’Golo Kante for victory at Crystal Palace.The midfielder struck the only goal of the game.Sarri stated: “He has to think about the defence first of all. Then he is improving, especially in movements without the ball. His movement today was really very good and was done with the right timing.”When we have to play against opponents who are very low, it’s difficult for the striker and wingers to find space. So for us the midfielders’ movement without the ball is very important.”Now we have to work on Loftus-Cheek and on Barkley. Loftus-Cheek especially is a great player with the ball, but he can improve a lot in his movement without the ball.” last_img read more

4 days agoNewcastle fullback Jetro Willems: We ran Chelsea close

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Newcastle fullback Jetro Willems: We ran Chelsea closeby Paul Vegas4 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveNewcastle United fullback Jetro Willems has urged teammates to stay calm after their 1-0 loss at Chelsea.The narrow defeat plunged the Magpies back into the relegation zone and piled the pressure back on the team ahead of next weekend’s tough encounter with Wolverhampton Wanderers at St James’ Park.Willems said: “It was close. I think we had the game under control and we were a little bit unlucky.”If it wasn’t for the goal I think we did good defensively – they have a good team and they are difficult players to play against.”Attacking, we could do more.”In the first half, we could have been more dangerous on the counter attack.”We had some chances – sometimes we were unlucky, but sometimes I think we need to just shoot when we are in front of goal.” last_img read more

Columbus Crew return to Ohio State to honor Connor Senn

For players participating in Tuesday’s Connor Senn Memorial soccer game between the Ohio State men’s soccer team and the Columbus Crew, the event is more than an exhibition match. The charity event, which honors former OSU soccer player Connor Senn who collapsed on the field of play and died hours later, transcends sport, said Columbus Crew coach Robert Warzycha. On Sept. 26, 2001, Senn, a then-18-year-old freshman, collapsed on the field during a game at Akron. The cause of death was determined to be a congenital heart defect that, at the time, went undetected. “I would call (Senn) more of a family member,” Warzycha said. “He was a soccer player, we all play soccer. It’s very important for us to be at this game. This is something that we all remember and it raises awareness of what happened on the field and raises money for the cause.” The charity match was established in 2002 and will be back Tuesday for the 11th time. The event raises awareness for sudden cardiac arrest in athletes with proceeds benefiting the Connor Senn Memorial Fund and the Dorothy M. Davis Heart & Lung Research Institute at OSU’s Wexner Medical Center, according to ohiostatebuckeyes.com. For the first nine years of the game, OSU took on the Crew. Last year, though, the Crew elected not to play in the charity match. Crew technical director Brian Bliss told The Lantern in May 2011 that playing in the Connor Senn Memorial Match would cost the club $10,000 because of the Major League Soccer Players Union’s most recently ratified collective-bargaining agreement, which stipulates that MLS clubs can schedule only one non-league “free game” per season. The Crew had already scheduled an international friendly against Premier League’s Newcastle United to be played on July 26, so OSU instead hosted the Dayton Dutch Lions of the United Soccer Leagues. The Buckeyes lost to the Dutch Lions, 3-1, May 2. This year, the Crew returns to take on the Buckeyes and OSU coach John Bluem said having them back is an important factor for both teams. “It’s neat. It’s the pro team in town playing against Ohio State University men’s Division I team,” Bluem said. “The Crew really add that little bit of extra juice to it.” Bluem said he’s looking for his team to go out and show that they can keep up with the pros. He also said he would like to have the opportunity to play everyone on the team, but the bench might see limited action in this contest. “We want to show that we’re a good team. We’re going to put out there who we think is the best group and play them for as much of the game as possible,” Bluem said. “Hopefully we can go about 70 to 75 minutes and it’s a good game and it’s close.” Former OSU and current Crew goalkeeper Matt Lampson previously played in the game as a Buckeye from 2008-2011 and said he’s not going to take the game lightly. “I’m excited about it and I’m going to be honest, I want to make it not close … You would think that I would have some sort of compassion for my alma mater, but unfortunately,” Lampson said, pausing while a grin spread across his face, “it’s not there. This is my job now and I gotta go out and do it.” Lampson said when he wore scarlet and gray, OSU often went into the match hoping to make it close but quickly realized they would be outplayed by the pros. He said he’s expecting this year’s match to play out in similar fashion. “When I played with OSU, they would say things like, ‘All right we’re going to go out and play against these guys,’” Lampson said. “And we would try for about five minutes and then we were like, ‘Well, they’re way better. Lets hang back a little bit.’ That’s what I’m expecting, for them to hang back and not attack so much.” Warzycha said he plans on starting players that don’t normally crack the Crew’s starting lineup, but added that everyone on the Crew could have a chance to play. “We’ll see how the game goes and everybody is going to be on the bench, so if we need to use somebody, then they’ll go in and play,” Warzycha said. Regardless of the outcome, Bluem said he is proud of what the game has become, grateful the Crew have agreed to be a part of it and said there is a lesson that can be learned from all of it. “Life is precious. Sudden cardiac death is a scary thing that can happen in athletics and in general walks of life. The Columbus Crew have been unbelievable as a partner for the last 11 years,” he said. “Our goal now is through research and education, which we can now fund, to prevent sudden cardiac death.” Tuesday’s game kicks off at 7 p.m. at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. Tickets are $5 for adults and $3 for children and students and can be purchased online at OhioStateBuckeyes.com or by calling 1-800-GO-BUCKS. Pat Brennan contributed to this article. read more

Ohio State mens wrestling readying itself for National Duals after loss to

The No. 5 Ohio State wrestling team is trying to bounce back after losing its regular season finale against No. 1 Penn State, 29-18, as it heads into the 2013 NWCA/Cliff Keen “Mat Mayhem” National Duals. The Buckeyes, which received an automatic bid to the event’s finals because they are among the top four returning dual-meet teams, finished the regular season 11-3 and 5-3 in the Big Ten. The automatic bid finalists were awarded based on their performance and rankings from the 2011-2012 season. OSU sophomore Hunter Stieber, ranked No. 2 in the 141-pound weight class, said that he likes the team’s chances in the postseason. “I feel pretty good,” he said. “Team-wise, I think we’ll be all right. We bounce back pretty well. We’re an older team so it should be good.” The Division I National Duals will feature a new format this year with eight teams in the finals instead of the traditional four. The addition of four automatic bid finalists increases the initial pool of competitors from 16 to 20. The teams that did not receive automatic bids are divided up into four different regions: Cornell University Region: Cornell, Hofstra, Virginia, Nebraska Kent State University Region: Kent State, Oklahoma State, Northern Iowa, Wisconsin Oregon State University Region: Oregon State, Oklahoma, Virginia Tech, Michigan University of Missouri Region: Missouri, Maryland, Wyoming, Purdue The automatic bid finalists are Ohio State, Iowa, Minnesota and Illinois. Each region will host a one-day competition Sunday. The winners will move on to join the four automatic bid teams at the University of Minnesota for the finals on Feb. 22-23 in Minneapolis. Sophomore 149-pounder Cam Tessari said he is looking to pick up where he left off coming off a big 3-1 win against then-No. 7-ranked sophomore Andrew Alton of Penn State. “I’m excited for it (the National Duals),” he said. “I was a little rocky at the beginning of the season but I think I’m starting to hit my stride.” OSU coach Tom Ryan said there are a few kinks the team needs to work out between now and the tournament, but he has high hopes. “I feel great about this team,” he said. “Up and down the lineup we have good guys. We have to fight a little harder, but we’re going to be ready to go.” Last year, OSU failed to make the finals of the National Duals when it lost to Oklahoma State in Stillwater, Okla. This year, they’ll look to avenge that loss. The Buckeyes’ first match is set to start at 6 p.m. on Feb. 22 at Williams Arena in Minneapolis, Minn. The finals will conclude Feb. 23. read more

Ohio State field hockey splits weekend slate

OSU freshman midfielder/forward Maddy Humphrey makes a play on the ball during a game against Ball State Sept. 14. at Buckeye Varsity Field. OSU won 3-2 in OTCredit: Melissa Prax / Lantern photographerTwo first-half goals from freshman midfielder Maddy Humphrey propelled Ohio State field hockey to a 3-1 victory against the Kent State Golden Flashes Sunday afternoon.Humphrey opened the scoring with a breakaway finish one-on-one with Kent State sophomore goalkeeper Andrea Rinehart just a little more than two minutes into the game at Buckeye Varsity Field.Three minutes later, she struck again, scoring on a rebound from junior back Emma Royce’s penalty corner shot.The early lead gave OSU (5-8, 0-4) the confidence to stay aggressive throughout the game against Kent State. Buckeye coach Anne Wilkinson said the team fed off the energy of Humphrey’s early goals.“They’re not playing like they’re behind the eight ball,” Wilkinson said of her team playing from ahead. “You just see (freshman forward) Annabel Sams and (freshman midfielder) Morgan Kile taking off with speed, and their speed kills.”OSU dominated in shots, 24-7, and penalty corners, 15-4, Sunday. It took Kent State (5-8) until the 17-minute mark of the second half for the Golden Flashes to pick up their first penalty corner opportunity.With momentum appearing to swing toward Kent State, Wilkinson called a timeout to regroup with 15:27 left in the game while nursing a 2-0 lead.Sams came out of the timeout and dribbled coast-to-coast to score an unassisted goal, giving OSU a 3-0 advantage.“I think we were one today,” Sams said. “And that showed. I think we had good connections and once we got the ball, we were really an attacking force.”Kent State got on the board with 11:52 remaining on a tip-in goal from senior forward Hannah Faulkner. The goal was Faulkner’s 10th of the season, but came too late in a game where OSU refused to give up possession.Humphrey’s two goals gave her 11 for the season as a part of her 30 points total, which both lead the team. Humphrey said she was pleased with the performance, but added the team needs to convert more on its penalty corner opportunities.“We unfortunately didn’t finish a lot of our corners today, which we’ll work on,” Humphrey said. “But just keep attacking and attacking (was) the mentality. They were getting frustrated and it kept pumping us up to shoot more.”The Buckeyes’ Sunday triumph came two days after they fell in a conference matchup.OSU couldn’t manage to get its first Big Ten victory Friday in Piscataway, N.J., against conference newcomer Rutgers.The Buckeyes and Scarlet Knights were tied at halftime, 1-1, when Rutgers (6-7, 1-4) went on a quick scoring spurt to put OSU away.Redshirt-sophomore midfielder Alyssa Bull took a cross in front of the cage from sophomore forward Rachel Yaney and finished to give Rutgers a 2-1 lead.Five minutes later, junior forward Katie Champion put the game out of reach, scoring on an assist from sophomore forward Jasmine Cole.OSU added a late goal from Royce, but ultimately fell, 3-2.Wilkinson said the team has to be more physical if they want to make a late run in the Big Ten Tournament in November.OSU is set to face Indiana on Friday in Bloomington, Ind., at 3 p.m. before taking on Iowa on Sunday at Buckeye Varsity Field at noon. read more

Buckeye baseball tops Toledo 92 for 15th win of the season

Redshirt-sophomore infielder L Grant Davis (right)​ secures first base during a game against Toledo on March 24 at Bill Davis Stadium. OSU won, 9-2. Credit: Stacie Jackson / Lantern photographerAfter a slow start in February, the Ohio State baseball team is surging through March.Balance across the field has continued to be the theme for the Buckeyes, as they tallied their 15th win of the season Tuesday afternoon with a 9-2 win against the Toledo Rockets at Bill Davis Stadium.  Freshman pitcher Jacob Niggemeyer started on the mound for the Buckeyes and picked up the win after giving up just two runs in 6.0 innings of work.The Rockets kept it close through five innings after initially taking a 1-0 lead in the first. But OSU tacked on six runs between the sixth, seventh and eighth innings to seal the win.“We got off to a slow start, but we finished really strong,” coach Greg Beals.The game shifted for the Buckeyes when junior Jake Post took the mound.“Once we went to the bullpen we really gained control of the ball game,” Beals said.Senior catcher Connor Sabanosh was quick to credit Post’s performance after he tossed 1.2 innings and gave up just one hit.“We always have faith in Jake, every time he comes in we feel like we are going to have a shutdown inning,” Sabanosh said. “Once he came in we really added on the last three innings. It allowed us (the field players) to settle and just play and let Jake do his thing.”The Buckeye offensive domination started in the bottom of the fourth with a home run by junior infielder Troy Kuhn.OSU continued to excel in the batters box with a couple two-out hits.“We got quality at-bats late in the game and got a lot of two out hits,” Beals said. “Those are big difference makers on the scoreboard, because you either get the two out hit and score the run or you don’t and the innings over.”The top of batting order has continued to be the offensive leader for the Buckeyes, working off the bats of Sabanosh and sophomore centerfielder Troy Montgomery. Montgomery has hits in 13-consecutive games and has reached base safely in 16-consecutive games, both being the sophomore’s career bests. Sabanosh has also reached base safely in 15-consecutive games.But the stats are not Sabanosh’s main concern, he said.“I try not to look at stats or anything. I know when I feel well and I try to just not think at all and play simple baseball,” Sabanosh said. “But it’s always nice to get a couple hits in a game.”Montgomery added that he too is not concerned with the stats, but more focused on doing his job to help the team win.“I’m the lead off hitter so anything I can do to get on base, maybe steal some bags and score a few runs then I feel like I’m doing my job,” Montgomery said.Even though Montgomery and Sabanosh are clicking consistently with their bats, the true success has come from the Buckeyes’ balance across the offense, Beals said.“All nine spots on our line up got a hit today and that makes it tough on a pitching staff, when you are able to get something all the way top to bottom in your lineup,” he said.OSU will look to continue their offensive momentum as they take on the Akron Zips on Wednesday at 5:05 p.m. read more

Lascelles insists Newcastle players are frustrated

first_imgNewcastle United captain Jamaal Lascelles insists the team is frustrated with their recent run of results.Rafael Benitez’s side are yet to win a game in the Premier League this season and despite creating a host of chances (27 shots) in their home defeat to Brighton & Hove Albion, the team couldn’t find the back of the net.Beram Kayal gave the visitors the lead when he diverted a shot from Jose Izquierdo past Newcastle goalkeeper Martin Dubravka in the 29th minute.The Magpies pushed for an equaliser in the second half but came up short in the final third of the pitch.“It’s definitely frustrating for us as players,” said Lascelles, according to The Shields Gazette.Benitez insists he didn’t leave for the money Manuel R. Medina – August 13, 2019 Former Newcastle United manager Rafael Benitez says he didn’t leave the club for China just because of the hefty Chinese Super League money.“They didn’t have much more other than the goal they scored from a corner which should have been a goal kick.”“We had all the chances. They had one chance, and had all three points.”“We should have defended the corner better, but we shouldn’t have been in that position in the first place.”“In pretty much every game we’ve played, bar Leicester, we’ve played some decent football and things haven’t gone our way. One result, one win, and we can really start our season properly.”“It’s just working out how we do that, because at the moment, we’re a little way off that. “There’s no reason to panic. We have loads of positives to take from that game, like all the chances we created.”last_img read more

As part of the expanded agreement IBCAP and Nagra

first_imgAs part of the expanded agreement, IBCAP and Nagra will implement various strategies including the establishment of a monitoring lab to monitor and detect unauthorised use of IBCAP member content and automated systems to monitor set-top boxes, websites, and other streaming platforms.Nagra will detect servers providing IBCAP member content without authorisation, including both linear feeds and VOD content, and take actions to have that content removed. The company will also provide investigation services and enhanced litigation support tools.Nagra’s investigation services will be focused on identifying retailers selling pirate services, educating them about the risks of selling those pirate services, and collecting evidence for future investigations and lawsuits.IBCAP represents over 30 members and over 130 television channels from around the world, including well-known broadcasters of Arabic, Hindi, Urdu, and Bangla content.“While anti-piracy measures against mainstream content seem to be an increasing priority for distributors and content owners, no organization was focused exclusively on protecting international and multicultural content. IBCAP was formed three years ago to fill this gap and has achieved significant success through its monitoring and takedown efforts. The expansion of our agreement with Nagra will help us leverage the latest technologies and expertise in content protection and anti-piracy with the aim of putting pirates out of business and replacing them with legitimate providers,” said Chris Kuelling, executive director of IBCAP. ““Nagra is constantly expanding its portfolio of content value protection technologies and services, and this contract marks a milestone in our commitment to support broadcasters and content creators in the protection of their content from piracy in foreign markets,” said Frederic Guitard, vice-president media security services, Nagra.“Developing automated, state-of-the-art tools to detect unauthorized streaming – especially on increasingly popular IPTV set-top boxes and Kodi add-ons – helps ensure we can take swift and decisive action against pirates and maintain the value of the services offered to IBCAP members.”last_img read more

Amazon Prime Video has boarded a first highend dr

first_imgAmazon Prime Video has boarded a first high-end drama from All3Media, which is producing for its backer, cable giant Liberty Global.The Feed will go out in the US, Canada and Latin America as an Amazon exclusive with Liberty-owned Virgin Media airing it in the UK as its debut scripted original.Other Liberty cable services will offer it to customers in their respective territories.The drama comes from The Walking Dead writer Channing Powell, with distributor All3Media International and All3 prodco Studio Lambert attached.In 2016, All3 scored a high-end drama output deal with Liberty and Virgin.The Feed will be based on a recently published novel from Nick Clark Windo of the same name, and will launch globally in 2019.Set in London in the near future, the psychological thriller centres of the family of a man who created an omnipresent technology that is implanted into nearly everybody’s brain, allowing them to share information, emotions and memories instantly. The family is driven apart as the tech goes wrong and people with the implant become murderous.Powell, a writer and co-executive producer on the past five seasons of AMC’s The Walking Dead, is executive producer along with Susan Hogg (Three Girls) and Stephen Lambert, with Carl Tibbetts (Black Mirror) directing.“The Feed has an incredibly provocative story that will challenge and entertain our customers,” said Brad Beale, VP of worldwide TV content acquisition at Amazon Prime Video.  “Channing Powell has an amazing track record captivating audiences globally and we’re excited to be collaborating with her on this project.”For Liberty Global, the commission is part of a drive to own more of the content it offers subscribers.Last year, it commissioned a debut drama, The Rook, from Lionsgate (a studio in which it is a shareholder). Starz, which Lionsgate bought in 2016, will air that in the US.Working with All3, which it owns along with Discovery Communications, is a large component of that strategy, chief programming officer Bruce Mann has said.“We want large scale, ambitious shows about contemporary ideas that make a global impact and get people talking, and so we were delighted Stephen and Susan brought us such a bold and thought-provoking series,” he said today.Studio Lambert, meanwhile, is known for unscripted series such as Gogglebox and Undercover Boss, but made a significant impact with its debut scripted series, the BBC three-part drama Three Girls.All3Media International has rights for territories not covered by the agreement.last_img read more

ShareTweet

first_imgShareTweet “People across this island are alive to the constitutional change that is unfolding in front of us. “The Scottish people are about to embark on a new conversation about independence, it is likely that Boris Johnson will soon be the British Prime Minister. “Old political certainties and old majorities are no more. On an island of many political minorities, the only option is to build a broad coalition for change.“Scottish Independence campaigners compiled a 600 page manifesto outlining what health services, schools, the economy and investment would look like in their new Scotland. “They built a vibrant coalition across classes, creeds and backgrounds. “And even then, they fell just short. Irish Nationalism must learn that lesson. “We must now put in the hard yards to persuade our friends and neighbours that their interests are best served in a reconciled and prosperous new Ireland. We must spill our sweat to create that vision.“No one party can shape that vision of a New Ireland. “I have previously proposed the re-establishment of the New Ireland Forum post Brexit to secure a broad investment from all parties. “It remains the best way to produce a blueprint for unity.“Let the conversation that we’re about to have be based on what’s best for people. Let it be a cross-community conversation on a vision for the future that reflects where we are and where we want to be. “That’s the challenge that lies ahead,” added the SDLP leader.Eastwood welcomes recognition of need for Unity plan was last modified: June 7th, 2019 by John2John2 Tags: He said: “I’m glad to hear that Sinn Féin is moving to the position that I have been outlining for some time. “Their initial reaction to my suggestion that calling for a border poll with no plan or idea on how it would be delivered would be madness was entirely negative. “Indeed, they have spent months attacking SDLP members for that view.“It has taken time, as these things often do, but I’m glad that Sinn Féin leaders are now coming to the SDLP position. colum eastwoodEastwood welcomes recognition of need for Unity planFOYLE MLASDLP LEADERSinn FeinUnity Plan SDLP leader Colum EastwoodSDLP Leader Colum Eastwood has welcomed recognition from former Sinn Féin President Gerry Adams that a comprehensive plan is needed for Irish Unity before any referendumThe Foyle MLA said that it has taken parties too long to come to that realisation.last_img read more

That title wouldnt make for much of a campaign sl

first_imgThat title wouldn’t make for much of a campaign slogan, and yet, it’s the natural outcome of one particular politician’s promise. Most of the notes I receive about the Affordable Health Care Act, or Obamacare, are first-person accounts of how a reader’s change in coverage or cost is affecting his life. These stories prompted several discussions with Andy Mangione, vice president of government relations of the Association of Mature American Citizens (AMAC). Andy serves as the lead legislative and government contact for AMAC in Washington, DC. He’s also responsible for national grassroots outreach and developing strategic partnerships. Andy is AMAC’s man on the scene in Washington, and he kindly agreed to sit down for an interview on the significant budget cuts to home health care that have been made as a result of Obamacare. I’ll let Andy get into the details.Dennis Miller: Welcome, Andy. Thanks for taking the time to educate our readers on the latest goings-on in Washington.Andy Mangione: My pleasure, Dennis.Dennis: Andy, let’s get right to it. I know you’re very concerned about how cuts to home health care will impact seniors. This is no longer a theoretical problem. I’d like to ask a two-part question: Can you tell our readers a bit about your organization and how these budget cuts will affect “mature American citizens?”Andy: Dan Weber, a private citizen, founded AMAC as an alternative to and competitor of AARP. AMAC is a right-of-center, conservative member benefits and senior advocacy organization for Americans age 50 and older. AMAC offers many of the same benefits and services as AARP. The biggest difference, though, is our approach to advocacy. AMAC is a member-driven organization. We do not sit in a boardroom and determine our stance on issues unilaterally. We take our marching orders from our members. They determine the issues that I bring to Washington, DC and help us to determine our policy and issues positions. We have over 1.2 million American members living in all 50 states. We add approximately 1,000-2,000 new, dues-paying members each week. I think it’s important to describe the Medicare home healthcare recipient before getting into the cuts. The average age of this beneficiary is 82. Two-thirds live below the federal poverty level, and they have chronic illnesses like heart disease, COPD, and diabetes. These are Medicare’s oldest, sickest, and poorest beneficiaries. Most of these folks reside in rural areas, and the majority of them are women. The $22 billion cuts over four years to Medicare home health care will mean these homebound seniors will have to seek care outside of their homes. The cuts will also devastate the home healthcare sector. And where will the money from these cuts go? To fund subsidies on the insurance exchanges and to expand Medicaid—two key components of Obamacare.Dennis: I recently wrote an article about long-term care insurance, which many refer to as nursing home insurance. I pointed out that a major provision of long-term care is home health care, which is actually “avoid nursing home insurance.” If the government is cutting back on money for home health care, what options will be available for those who need care?Andy: They’ll be forced to receive care in nursing homes or other institutional settings, which greatly increases their cost and negatively affects their healthcare outcomes. Also, keep in mind that most recipients of Medicare home health care reside in rural areas and do not have the same choices for nursing home or other institutional care that those who live in urban areas do.Dennis: Won’t that further overload hospitals and nursing homes, which in turn will add to the overall costs?Andy: Absolutely. Medicare home health care saved the Medicare program $3 billion over the last three years. Expenditures for non-Medicare home health care will definitely rise since these patients will be treated in nursing homes and other institutions.Dennis: I don’t know of anyone who, given a choice, wouldn’t prefer to stay at home for care. What impact will these budget cuts have on the home healthcare industry?Andy: The Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) looked at these cuts and estimated that nearly 500,000 jobs in the home healthcare sector will be lost. They also estimate that 5,000 home healthcare companies will become insolvent as a result of these cuts by 2017.Dennis: You touched on something I hadn’t thought through before: the significant impact these cuts will have on working women and small-business owners. What can people do now? The budget cuts have already been passed. Is it too late?Andy: It’s not too late. H.R.5110, the SAVE Medicare Home Health Act, was recently introduced to rescind these cuts and replace them with commonsense accountability for home healthcare agencies, which would increase the quality of care for patients. The House will vote on the budget-neutral H.R.5110 in the fall, and if it passes—and it has a good chance of doing so—then it’s on to the Senate. If you would like to reach out to your Congressional representatives to urge them to support H.R.5110, please feel free to visit our home healthcare site. 90% of the businesses that provide home health care are small businesses. And, as I previously mentioned, CMS estimates that 5,000 of these businesses are at risk of closing their doors as a result of these cuts. Women own the majority of these businesses, and the majority of their employees—the nurses and other allied health professionals who provide care—are also women. CMS also estimated that 500,000 of these jobs are threatened by these cuts. That’s a lot of women-owned businesses and female employees drastically affected by these cuts. Also, the vast majority of the patients receiving home health care are women. Any way you evaluate it, these cuts to home health care disproportionately affect women in a very negative way.Dennis: I’d like to ask one question on a different topic. When I’ve written about Obamacare in the past, I’ve received three forms of feedback. The first was genuine concern, and the second was political criticism. Third, I heard from a large group that basically has a hard time believing it. Their sentiment was: “That just could not happen in America!” How do you respond to people who are having a hard time believing that Obamacare is going to have a major and possibly negative impact on their lives and their health care?Andy: I would say that elections have consequences. Not only can this happen in America, it already has happened! President Obama burst onto the national scene promising hope and change and certainly delivered on the “change” promise. Only it was not the change that most Americans were seeking. Like it or not—and AMAC members most definitely do not like it—Obamacare is now the law of the land. All is not lost, though. There’s always another federal election every two years, when Americans have the opportunity to right the ship and elect people who identify with their values and beliefs. Get involved and research candidates before giving your precious vote to an articulate, attractive candidate who looks great in a suit. Take the time to find the substance behind the style.Dennis: Andy, on behalf of all our readers, thanks for sharing your boots-on-the-ground input. Hopefully our subscribers will pitch in and let their elected representatives know how they feel. I should share that I’m a card-carrying member of AMAC. While there are several organizations that claim to represent seniors, I’ve found that most don’t represent my views well. AMAC doesn’t donate to political action committees, individual campaigns, or endorse candidates. It does listen to its members and work on issues of major concern. Like many laws, the details of Obamacare have emerged after the law was passed. If those details frighten you, make sure the organizations you belong to reflect that sentiment.On the Lighter Side When you read this, Jo and I will be in San Antonio at the Casey Summit. We’re both looking forward to visiting the Alamo and enjoying the San Antonio River Walk. If you’re attending, please flag me down and say hello. If not, you can listen to all of the compelling presentations on the Summit Audio Collection. I recommend preordering to take advantage of the sizable discount. And finally… Until next week…last_img read more

Most Important Broadcast Of 250 Million Traders

first_imgMost Important Broadcast Of $250 Million Trader’s 3-Decade Career This reclusive millionaire was the moneymaking expert Fortune 500 Executives from Boeing and Chevron turned to. But now, he’s doing something unlike anything done before… you may be shocked and blindsided. Think before you click here. — Details on the “next Bitcoin” – Buy this top crypto pick now This crypto has a market cap well under $100 million… but it recently flashed the same buy signal as two other cryptos that soared 208% in three months… and 1,522% in eight months. For the next few days only, you can get all the details here. Justin’s note: Today, I’m featuring a new essay from one of the best value investors in our business, Bonner Private Portfolio editor Chris Mayer.Longtime readers know it pays to listen to Chris’ advice. Over a 10-year span, he outperformed not only the S&P 500, but also legendary investors like Warren Buffett and Carl Icahn. Chris was able to do this by finding hidden pools of value in the market. Below, he shares a little-known secret to uncover these gems… By Chris Mayer, editor, Bonner Private Portfolio Hard as it is to believe, there’s a large group of “investors” out there who don’t care about the price of what they’re buying. They don’t care about earnings, dividends, or any of that. They buy, no matter what. And the result is a market full of over-loved and overvalued stocks. We deal in strange markets these days, with bizarre, distorted prices. Seriously, I’ll prove it. Take a look at Coca-Cola’s annual revenue and share price from 2012–17: In 2017, Coca-Cola delivered another year of declining sales. And the stock was up again. So nothing has changed. A company can’t keep reporting lower and lower profits and somehow see the stock price continue to go higher and higher. Eventually, you get absurd prices. Today, I’ll show you the group of investors who are causing these distorted prices… and a little-known trick to fade—or counter—this trend to find value in the market. The Rise of Index Investors Companies like Coca-Cola can see their share prices rise, despite falling earnings, because of a practice called indexing. An example of indexing is when you put your money in an S&P 500 Index fund, or exchange-traded fund (ETF). These funds aim to mimic the returns of the S&P 500 by buying all the shares in the index in the exact proportion they are held in the index. The fees are very low. And since most actively managed funds can’t beat the index, index funds have become a popular option. Popular may be an understatement. The Vanguard Group—one of the largest providers of index funds and ETFs—has $4.5 trillion under management. That’s no typo. Trillion, with a “T.” The top 10 index firms report $9.2 trillion in indexed assets. That’s about a third of the value of tradable shares in the S&P 500. And the inflow continues. And those inflows are creating distortions. You have a steady buyer sending a tsunami of money into index funds as well as a limited number of big stocks. Indexers don’t care if Coca-Cola is overvalued. If it is in the index, the index fund has to buy it. Period. Over the years, this creates odd effects on the pricing of those stocks in the index. Few do a better job of documenting these distortions than Murray Stahl, the chief investment officer and co-founder of Horizon Kinetics, a New York-based investment firm. Murray calls companies like Coca-Cola “revenue decliners.” In March 2017, Stahl warned that Coca-Cola was overvalued. He showed that sales and earnings had fallen since 2012. And yet the stock carried a premium valuation. “No one seems concerned that a highly caloric soft drink like Coca-Cola is losing market share to healthier alternatives,” he wrote. How to explain it? Coca-Cola is an index favorite. And the flood of money pouring into index funds gives stocks like Coca-Cola lots and lots of automatic buyers. I think it is a leading contributor to overvaluation. Where to Find Value Today Here’s a little-known secret of how S&P constructs its index: The focus is on the market cap, as indicated by the float. The float is the number of shares outstanding less shares held by insiders. Thus, the index overweights shares with low insider ownership, like Western Union. And it underweights shares with high insider ownership, such as Berkshire Hathaway. That’s the exact opposite of what a smart investor would do. Instead of piling into overvalued index funds, you should be attentive to the differences between companies. It may not feel like it because the indexers have done very well blindly betting on the S&P 500. But they are taking risks that will catch up with them eventually. In Bonner Private Portfolio, we continue to own firms that are either not in the S&P 500 or that are underweighted because of high insider ownership. That’s where we’re finding value. On the flip side, there is a steady supply of sellers of stocks not favored by indexes, as money flows away from the active managers who would typically hold such stocks and toward the indexers. The result is that you can find value in stocks not favored by the indexers. Now is a great time to be a stock picker. Regards,center_img — Recommended Link Recommended Link Chris Mayer Editor, Bonner Private Portfolio P.S. How should you approach your investments? How should you think about them? Those are the types of questions I tackle in my newest book, How Do You Know: A Guide to Clear Thinking About Wall Street, Investing & Life. How Do You Know? is full of ideas about investing—including one that hasn’t been part of the public investing discussion in nearly 60 years. But it’s not just another book on investing. My goal is not just to give you ideas, but to provide practical guidelines for uncluttering your thinking—that is, for getting unhelpful ideas and misleading information out of the way. You can order your copy of How Do You Know? in paperback or Kindle format right here… Reader Mailbag Today, a reader responds to our featured interviews (here and here) with cryptocurrency expert Teeka Tiwari on why the stage is set for another crypto rally… My main problem in purchasing cryptocurrencies is they are completely unregulated. Example. You buy tokens at a cryptocurrency IPO crowd sale. Then you try to make an inquiry into the cryptocurrency that you purchased. They don’t have to respond. They don’t have to provide you with ANY information that you may be requesting or inquiring about. They can drop the value of your cryptocurrency to worthless on the drop of a dime and owe no explanation, period. Please do not get me wrong. I like the idea of blockchain transactions. However, cryptocurrencies have a long road to travel before they become feasible as an exchange. For now, no thank you.—Albert Do you think now is a good buying opportunity in cryptos? Or are you staying on the sidelines? Let us know here. If you’d like to learn more about cryptos, we urge you to check out this new presentation from Teeka.last_img read more

Doctors at the National Institutes of Health say t

first_imgDoctors at the National Institutes of Health say they’ve apparently completely eradicated cancer from a patient who had untreatable, advanced breast cancer.The case is raising hopes about a new way to harness the immune system to fight some of the most common cancers. The methods and the patient’s experience are described Monday in a paper published in the journal Nature Medicine.”We’re looking for a treatment — an immunotherapy — that can be broadly used in patients with common cancers,” says Dr. Steven Rosenberg, an oncologist and immunologist at the National Cancer Institute, who has been developing the approach.Rosenberg’s team painstakingly analyzes the DNA in a sample of each patient’s cancer for mutations specific to their malignancies. Next, scientists sift through tumor tissue for immune system cells known as T cells that appear programmed to home in on those mutations.But Rosenberg and others caution that the approach doesn’t work for everyone. In fact, it failed for two other breast cancer patients. Many more patients will have to be treated — and followed for much longer — to fully evaluate the treatment’s effectiveness, the scientists say.Still, the treatment has helped seven of 45 patients with a variety of cancers, Rosenberg says. That’s a response rate of about 15 percent, and included patients with advanced cases of colon cancer, liver cancer and cervical cancer.”Is it ready for prime time today? No,” Rosenberg says.”Can we do it in most patients today? No.”But the treatment continues to be improved. “I think it’s the most promising treatment now being explored for solving the problem of the treatment of metastatic, common cancers,” he says.The breast cancer patient helped by the treatment says it transformed her life.”It’s amazing,” says Judy Perkins, 52, a retired engineer who lives in Port St. Lucie, Fla.When Perkins was first diagnosed and treated for breast cancer in 2003, she thought she’d beaten the disease. “I thought I was done with it,” she says.But about a decade later, she felt a new lump. Doctors discovered the cancer had already spread throughout her chest. Her prognosis was grim. “I became a metastatic cancer patient,” says Perkins. “That was hard.”Perkins went through round after round of chemotherapy. She tried every experimental treatment she could find. But the cancer kept spreading. Some of her tumors grew to the size of tennis balls.”I had sort of essentially run out of arrows in my quiver,” she says. “While I would say I had some hope, I was also kind of like ready to quit, too.”Then she heard about the experimental treatment at the NIH. It was designed to fight some of the most common cancers, including breast cancer.”The excitement here is that we’re attacking the very mutations that are unique to that cancer — in that patient’s cancer and not in anybody else’s cancer. So it’s about as personalized a treatment as you can imagine,” Rosenberg says.His team identified and then grew billions of T cells for Perkins in the lab and then infused them back into her body. They also gave her two drugs to help the cells do their job.The treatment was grueling. Perkins says the hardest part was the side effects of a drug known as interleukin, which she received to help boost the effectiveness of the immune system cells. Interleukin causes severe flu-like symptoms, such as a high fever, intense malaise and uncontrollable shivering.But the treatment apparently worked, Rosenberg reports. Perkins’ tumors soon disappeared. And, more than two years later, she remains cancer-free.”All of her detectable disease has disappeared. It’s remarkable,” Rosenberg says.Perkins is thrilled.”I’m one of the lucky ones,” Perkins says. “We got the right T cells in the right place at the right time. And they went in and ate up all my cancer. And I’m cured. It’s freaking unreal.”In an article accompanying the new paper, Laszlo Radvanyi, president and scientific director of the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, calls the results “remarkable.”The approach and other recent advances suggest scientists may be “at the cusp of a major revolution in finally realizing the elusive goal of being able to target the plethora of mutations in cancer through immunotherapy,” Radvanyi writes.Other cancer researchers agree.”When I saw this paper I thought: “Whoa! I mean, it’s very impressive,” says James Heath, president of the Institute for Systems Biology in Seattle.”One of the most exciting breakthroughs in biomedicine over the past decade has been activating the immune system against various cancers. But they have not been successful in breast cancer. Metastatic breast cancer is basically a death sentence,” Heath says. “And this shows that you can reverse it. It’s a big deal.”One key challenge will be to make the treatment easier, faster, and affordable, Rosenberg says. “We’re working literally around the clock to try to improve the treatment.” Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

The US Environmental Protection Agency says it w

first_imgThe U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says it will begin the process this year of setting limits on two man-made chemicals that are linked to cancer and other illnesses, and are found widely in drinking water and soil. The agency’s long-awaited plan — promised last year by former administrator Scott Pruitt — addresses chemicals that are part of a group known as PFAS, for Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances. “It took groundbreaking efforts to develop this plan,” said EPA Acting Administrator Andrew Wheeler at a news conference in Philadelphia. “This is the first time we have utilized all of our program offices to deal with an emerging chemical of concern.”But critics say the move to regulate the chemicals “by the end of this year” amounts to yet another delay.”It has taken the EPA nearly a year just to kick the can even further down the road,” said U.S. Senator Tom Carper (D-Del.) In a statement, the environmental advocacy group Delaware Riverkeeper Network said the plan “lacks any sense of urgency and offers no timely relief to people exposed to these highly toxic compounds in their water.” As part of its plan, the EPA says it has begun the process of listing PFOA and PFOS — two kinds of PFAS — as hazardous substances under the Superfund law. It says that will help communities deal with existing contamination and recover costs from responsible parties.Dave Ross, the agency’s Assistant Administrator for Water, said EPA will also publish recommendations “very soon” on cleaning up the two chemicals in groundwater, an important source of drinking water for many communities. And he said the EPA is also looking at whether to regulate other chemicals in the PFAS family.Decades-old chemicals, growing local concernsPFAS chemicals have been linked to illnesses, including cancer, but there remain a lot of questions about how they affect people’s health and in what doses. There was a big health study involving one form of PFAS in the Mid-Ohio Valley. From that and other studies scientists are comfortable saying certain diseases are linked to PFAS exposure, but they won’t be more definitive than that.Acknowledging this lack of knowledge, EPA assistant administrator Ross said Thursday that the agency will step up its research into the chemicals’ human health and ecological effects. “Our goal is to close the gap on the science as quickly as possible,” he said.These chemicals have been around for decades and have been useful because they are good at repelling oil and water. They can be found in many products, including non-stick cookware, food wrappers, fabrics and fire-fighting foam. Manufacturers have agreed to stop using two forms of PFAS in the U.S. But it takes a long time for these chemicals to break down in the environment, which is why they remain a problem now. Some newer forms of PFAS chemicals are being used, and some people believe those are safer because they remain in the environment and our bodies for shorter periods. The issue gained more urgency in recent years as water suppliers tested for and found PFAS pollution as part of an Environmental Protection Agency program. The EPA required most water utilities to test for a list of PFAS chemicals from 2013 to 2015. In 2016 the agency lowered a non-binding health advisory limit for some PFAS compounds to 70 parts per trillion (ppt). Thursday, the EPA’s Ross said the agency’s latest testing showed that about 1 percent of public water systems had at least one sample with PFAS concentrations above that amount. Northeastern University and the Environmental Working Group have also created a map of contaminated sites and communities where PFAS has been detected in drinking water.Arguments for a stricter limit also gained traction after a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last year suggested PFAS chemicals may endanger human health at far lower levels than the EPA’s non-binding limit.In the absence of federal action, and amidst this growing local concern, some states have taken it upon themselves to limit the use of these chemicals.A number of companies believed to be responsible for PFAS pollution face lawsuits. The state of Minnesota sued 3M over the toxins and settled for $850 million last year. Pennsylvania is one of a number of states that have been working to curb PFAS levels where soil or groundwater contamination has been found. The drinking water around Horsham is a concern because of the chemicals’ long-term use in firefighting foam at nearby military bases. Blood tests on 235 residents of Horsham and two other townships by the Pennsylvania Department of Health last year found a large majority had levels of four PFAS chemicals that exceeded the national average, and that some of them had illnesses including elevated cholesterol, endocrine disruptions and cancer.While some local authorities have now installed filters to cut PFAS levels in water systems to within health limits, high levels of contamination persist in soil on the bases and in groundwater beneath themReporting in this story comes to us from StateImpact Pennsylvania, a public media collaboration covering Pennsylvania’s energy economy. Copyright 2019 WHYY. To see more, visit WHYY.last_img read more

74 of Marketers and CX Professionals Say Customer Loyalty is Driving Digital

first_imgNew Research from Clicktale Reveals Customer Loyalty to Be the Biggest Driver for Digital Experience StrategiesNearly three quarters of marketers and CX professionals (74%) are investing in digital experiences in an effort to foster long-term loyalty and build better relationships with their customers. That’s according to research from experience analytics company Clicktale, which surveyed 200 marketing and CX professionals across the US and UK.Released in Clicktale’s Defining Digital Experience report, the research found customer loyalty to be the number one priority for those building a digital experience (DX) strategy. This was followed by a need to understand customer behavior (67%) and a desire to create a clearer customer experience vision (67%).For those at a managerial level (CX and marketing managers) improving customer lifetime value was also identified as an important driver of DX strategy.Marketing Technology News: Amazon Dominates E-Commerce Share, Ebay and Walmart Less of a Focus, Feedvisor Study FindsCommenting on these findings, Sara Richter, CMO, Clicktale said: “As ever more customer interactions are completed via digital channels, marketers find themselves faced with a ‘switching economy’ – in which consumers regularly flit between different brands when they’re dissatisfied with a particular experience. Given this fact, is it any wonder that so many marketers are looking to secure long-term customer loyalty through their digital experience approach?“To achieve such loyalty, however, we as marketers need to think about what it is that our customers need, and to do that requires a strong understanding of customer behaviors. This is where the other key objectives come into play.Marketing Technology News: Elliot’s Mobile-First Commerce Platform Enables Direct-to-Consumer Distribution at Global Scale“In order to drive loyalty, marketers must improve their digital experiences. But to do that, they must have a clear vision and the behavioral data needed to back it up. None of these factors can exist in isolation – they must all form part of a single, unified DX strategy and be supported with the right behavioral technologies.”Marketing Technology News: Motionloft named a 2019 Gartner “Cool Vendor” in Location Services and Applications customer experienceCX professionalsDefining Digital ExperienceDX strategyMarketing TechnologyNews Previous ArticleLocal DTC Brands Top Glossier, Harry’s & Casper, Converting a Quarter of ConsumersNext Article96% of People Have Seen Ads That Reference Their Location, Indicating the Prevalence of Location-Specific Advertising 74% of Marketers and CX Professionals Say Customer Loyalty is Driving Digital Experience MTS Staff WriterMay 23, 2019, 4:11 pmMay 23, 2019 last_img read more

ATX Adds OTT Video Streaming Capabilities to Media Distribution Solution

first_imgNew Capabilities of MD16 Enhance Guest Experience and Enables Service Providers to Differentiate Video OfferingATX Networks, a global leader in digital access and media distribution solutions, introduced an enhancement to the MD16 bulk media distribution gateway that will enable service providers to offer hotels, hospitals, universities, apartments and other commercial customers streaming media capabilities. The new MD16 OTT streaming blade enables an over-the-top (OTT) video experience anywhere within the commercial enterprise facility on any device, including smartphones, tablets and PCs.Streaming linear video in a private network presents multiple challenges. The ATX streaming media blade overcomes these challenges to allow guests and residents to view live, linear television programming on personal devices, such as smartphones, tablets and PCs, without the requirement to install multi-rack solutions with standalone encoders and Web servers. ATX’s integrated OTT streaming solution reduces power consumption, space and operational complexity.“ATX continues to empower PayTV operators with the capabilities they require to reinvigorate their commercial and enterprise business strategies,” said Andrew Isherwood, Chief Technology and Strategy Officer, Media Distribution at ATX. “Our market-leading MD16s equipped with the new streaming blade will allow hotels, universities, hospitals and MDUs to offer their clientele a broadcast TV experience on their mobile devices.”Marketing Technology News: Vidyard Expands Offering to Bring Personalized Video App to Any Sales Professional, No Matter How They WorkThe MD16 OTT streaming blade enables universities, for example, to offer a campus-wide broadcast television experience to students on their mobile devices anywhere WiFi is available, including dorms, gyms and common areas. In hotel, apartment and hospital settings, the streaming blade allows guests, residence and patients to watch live TV on their own devices.The new streaming media blade consumes a single slot in the MD16. A single blade is capable of streaming 24 HD channels to as many as 250 devices. Content streamed from the MD16 is viewable on Apple (HLS) and Android (MPEG-Dash) devices. The streaming media blade interfaces with the existing WiFi Internet-delivery infrastructure and includes an integrated HTML-5 Web server, enabling end users to make streaming content selections through a Web browser. Near real-time encoding capabilities reduce delays of nearly a minute that are typical of commercial OTT services. End users play the video in their Web browsers, eliminating the need to download or install a separate app.Marketing Technology News: Loyalty Brands Announces Partnership with Textellent To Deliver Innovative SMS Sales & Marketing CapabilitiesThe MD16 offers PayTV operators a path to greater profitability in commercial accounts by delivering a single-box, fully integrated solution that reduces power consumption, space and other operational expenses. The integrated streaming blade also reduces on-premises bandwidth requirements, as fewer residents and guests will need to connect to Internet-based streaming services using external servers.“The addition of an integrated streaming blade makes an already compelling value proposition even better,” added Isherwood. “The MD16 makes it easy to deliver television programming to mobile devices wherever people congregate, including universities, offices and sporting events.”Marketing Technology News: Tellius Named by Gartner as a 2019 Cool Vendor in Analytics ATX NetworksMarketing Technology NewsMD16 bulk mediaMedia Distribution SolutionNewsOTT Video Streaming Previous ArticleHireVue Sponsors, Demonstrates Ethical AI Innovation at CogX 2019Next ArticleDomo IoT Cloud Now Integrates with Zendesk Data Platform to Deliver Better Customer Service ATX Adds OTT Video Streaming Capabilities to Media Distribution Solution PRNewswireJune 10, 2019, 4:58 pmJune 10, 2019 last_img read more

Highdose influenza vaccine associated fewer hospitalizations in dialysis patients

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Oct 24 2018Results from a new study suggest that high-dose influenza vaccine is associated with lower risk for hospitalizations in kidney failure patients on dialysis. The findings appear in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN).High-dose influenza vaccine, which contains fourfold more antigen than the standard dose, is linked with fewer cases of influenza and less severe influenza symptoms in the elderly general population. Whether the high-dose influenza vaccine benefits dialysis patients, whose immune response to vaccination is less robust than healthy patients, is uncertain. To investigate, Dana Miskulin, MD (Tufts Medical Center) and her colleagues compared hospitalizations and deaths during the 2015-16 and 2016-17 influenza seasons by vaccine type (standard trivalent, standard quadrivalent, and high-dose trivalent influenza vaccine) administered to more than 9000 patients in season within a national dialysis organization.Related StoriesNovel vaccine against bee sting allergy successfully testedResearchers identify possible role of polyphosphate in dialysis-related amyloidosis$3.1 million NIH funding awarded to develop universal flu vaccineReceiving high-dose vs. standard dose influenza vaccine in 2016-17 was associated with lower rates of hospitalization in dialysis patients, although this association was not seen in 2015-16. There were no differences in rates of death between patients receiving the high-dose vs. standard dose influenza vaccine during either influenza season.”We found that the administration of the high-dose influenza vaccine was associated with 8% fewer first hospitalizations than the standard dose vaccine in 2016-17. In 2015-16 there was no difference by vaccine type although statistical power was limited, with only 8% of patients receiving high dose that year, compared with 61% in 2016-17,” said Dr. Miskulin.Dr. Miskulin noted that the 2016-17 season results are consistent with lower hospitalizations with high-dose as compared with standard dose seen in the elderly general population. Adverse events were not collected in this study, but large clinical trials in the general population suggest that the high-dose vaccine is not associated with more adverse effects. “While these results should not be considered definitive, because vaccine type was not randomized, they suggest that there may be a reduction in influenza related morbidity in dialysis patients with use of the high-dose vs. standard dose vaccine,” said Dr. Miskulin.Studies of other strategies to increase influenza vaccine effectiveness in dialysis patients and other immunocompromised populations, including the use of adjuvants and booster doses, could also be beneficial, according to an accompanying editorial by Megan Lindley, MPH and David Kim, MD (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). “Even in the absence of increased vaccine effectiveness, improvements in influenza vaccination coverage among medically vulnerable populations such as dialysis patients could increase protection against influenza,” they wrote. “In groups where the burden of influenza disease and its complications are disproportionately felt, small improvements in vaccine effectiveness and vaccination coverage may have large impacts.” Source:https://www.asn-online.org/last_img read more

FinnBrain imaging study explores brain structure in newborns

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 30 2018Infant brain development is still poorly understood. Thus, research on the topic is vital as developing brains are sensitive to early environmental factors. Recognizing this, the FinnBrain imaging study conducted in Turku explores brain structure in newborns.Adult brain structure and the division of different functions between the hemispheres is already well studied. However, information on the developing brains of newborns is still limited, even though understanding this normal developmental process is important. Through understanding this process, future studies can more easily detect the effects that environmental factors, such as maternal prenatal health, may have on the infant brain.- The developing brain is most sensitive to environmental factors during pregnancy, and these factors may drastically alter the course of development, says Doctoral Candidate, Lic. Med. Satu Lehtola from the FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study at the University of Turku.Related StoriesPosterior parietal cortex plays crucial role in making decisions, research showsMercy Medical Center adds O-arm imaging system to improve spinal surgery resultsWearing a hearing aid may mitigate dementia riskIn the study, 68 babies aged 2-5 weeks were scanned using MRI. To investigate normal infant brain development, lobar volumes and their hemispheric differences, i.e. asymmetry, were explored. The effects of age and sex on lobar volumes and asymmetry were of particular interest.- We observed that in both sexes, the lobes were asymmetric in the same way: the right temporal lobe, left parietal, and left occipital lobes were larger than their counter side. Differences between sexes were found, but they were subtle and included only locally restricted areas in the grey matter, says Lehtola.In the findings, the effect of age manifested as different growth rates between grey and white matter, which aligns with existing research showing that the growth rate of grey matter is more rapid during the first years of life. When disaggregating grey matter into lobar volumes though, the lobar volumes of full-term infants did not differ in a statistically significant manner as infants’ ages only varied by a few weeks.- Not many studies on this topic have been carried out with such young infants, yet our results are in line with the previous findings and thus strengthen and broaden our perceptions on early brain development. The results provide a good basis to continue research on the effects of early environmental factors on brain volumes, which is a key aim of the FinnBrain research project, says Lehtola.Source: https://www.utu.fi/en/news/press-release/age-and-sex-affect-infant-brain-structurelast_img read more