Asian Games Kuwait welcomed back to Asian Games with OCA warning

first_imgJakarta: Kuwait was warned by the Olympic Council of Asia (OCA) on Saturday to stop its “world record” of government interference in sport or face being exiled for a third time.The International Olympic Committee (IOC) this week provisionally lifted its ban on Kuwait, allowing the Gulf state’s athletes to march under their own flag at Saturday’s Asian Games opening ceremony in Jakarta.But the IOC said that despite its “gesture of goodwill” the reasons for its original suspension remained valid.Also Read | Asian Games 2018: Indonesia’s richest man Michael Bambang Hartono to participate at 78 “This is a world record for government interference in the Olympic movement, no country is like this,” OCA director general Husain Al Musallam told AFP after an executive board meeting discussed the matter in Jakarta on Saturday.“We are very happy for the Kuwait National Olympic Committee and for the athletes,” he said.“We hope this will not happen in the future and the Kuwait government will respect the road map they have agreed with the IOC to lead to fresh, clean, transparent and democratic elections based on each sport’s statutes approved by their respective international bodies.”World sports bodies led by the IOC and FIFA suspended Kuwait in October 2015 for a second time since 2010 for political interference in sport.The IOC said that in reinstating Kuwait provisionally that it “acknowledged the progress” and the “positive discussions with the Government of Kuwait”.Read More | Asian Games 2018: Schedule, Timings, When and where to watch Al Musallam said Kuwait did not have much time to prove it was trying to meet IOC requirements.“We are going to review the situation with the IOC on October 3 and 4 to see if any of the agreement has been implemented on the ground, or if there is nothing,” said Al Musallam.“We really hope this thing will be finished.” For all the Latest Sports News News, Asian Games News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.last_img read more

Shoah Foundation’s film nominated for best short

first_imgThe team interviews Xia Shuqin about her experiences during the Nanjing Massacre in the late 1930s. (Photo courtesy of the Shoah Foundation)The USC Shoah Foundation’s documentary on the 1938 Nanjing Massacre, “A Girl and the Picture,” was nominated for best short film by the International Documentary Association in late October. Directed and produced by Academy Award winner Vanessa Roth and Shoah Foundation Executive Director Stephen Smith, the film follows the life of Xia Shuqin, an 89-year-old survivor, as she describes her story facing the Nanjing Massacre.“‘The Girl and The Picture’ is about the importance of bearing witness,” Smith said in an email to the Daily Trojan. “By focusing on Madame Xia’s relationship with her granddaughter and great grandson, the film underscores the importance of transferring the memory of an atrocity from one generation to another. The film binds their families across cultures and continents and highlights their shared commitment to preserving the memory of what happened.”The film was created over the course of six months and screened at various events, including Tribeca  and American Documentary film festivals. The creators hope that its message will impact international audiences, as they made many edits to the film to ensure its cultural legitimacy and accuracy, according to Roth. “I wanted to make sure that the domestic and international audience felt I was respecting and telling an authentic story,” Roth said. “I [didn’t] want it to feel disingenuous, I want to make sure that they feel proud about the story that they shared with me.”The story is special because it focuses on the specifics of a few characters, Roth said. Instead of integrating Madame Xia’s story into a broader history, Roth felt that the film would be more effective if it related to audiences through an authentic human experience.“My interest in [the film] was in making sure we made a film that was very human and personal to them,” she said. “We wanted to make a film through the lens of individual people … and translate that to being a story about the bigger moments in history.”The international award recognizes world-class non-fiction films and documentaries, and each nominated film expands on the compassion and interconnectedness of the human experience, according to the IDA’s mission statement. “The nomination is a welcome endorsement of our commitment to ensuring that the Nanjing Massacre doesn’t fade from collective memory, or become whitewashed by revisionist narratives,” Rob Kuznia, the Shoah Foundation’s external relations coordinator, said in an email to the Daily Trojan. However, according to Smith, the award does more than just recognize the efforts of the team. It’s also a sign that the international documentary society deemed it an important cultural resource and is encouraging the USC Shoah Foundation to continue its efforts in historical preservation. “We aren’t in this for awards,” Smith said. “We play the long game, and plan to preserve and share the personal stories of Madame Xia and other survivors of the Nanjing Massacre — be it via this film, or through their testimonies — in perpetuity, no matter what.”The award for best short film will be announced Dec. 8.last_img read more