CHILD NEUROLOGIST- CLINICAL ASSISTANT, ASSOCIATE OR FULL PROFESSOR

first_imgPosition Vacancy ID: Additional Link:Full Position Details 90493-AS Employment Class: Academic Staff-Renewable Contact: Child Neurologist- CLINICAL ASSISTANT, ASSOCIATE OR FULLPROFESSOR Instructions to Applicants: Pediatric fellowship or equivalent experience.Academic credentials and experience for appointment at the selectedrank of a non-tenure School of Medicine and Public Health trackfocusing primarily on clinical and teaching excellence. Appointmentat the rank of clinical associate or full professor rank requiresmeeting criteria for appointment level as defined in School ofMedicine and Public Health guidelines for promotion or appointmentto clinical associate or full professor on the Clinical Teachertrack. Hiring Department: The University of Wisconsin is an Equal Opportunity andAffirmative Action Employer.The Annual Security and Fire Safety Report contains current campussafety and disciplinary policies, crime statistics for the previous3 calendar years, and on-campus student housing fire safetypolicies and fire statistics for the previous 3 calendar years.UW-Madison will provide a paper copy upon request; please contactthe University ofWisconsin Police Department . This is a renewable appointment. CLINICAL PROFESSOR(D51NN) or CLINICAL ASSOC PROF(D52NN) or CLINICALASST PROF(D53NN) Working Title: NegotiableANNUAL (12 months) The School of Medicine and Public Health has a deep and profoundcommitment to diversity both as an end in itself but, also as avaluable means for eliminating health disparities. As such, westrongly encourage applications from candidates who foster andpromote the values of diversity and inclusion. Applications Open: Apr 27 2017 Central Daylight TimeApplications Close: Advertised Salary: License or Certificate: Term:center_img MD, MD/PhD, or DO – Board eligible or certified in Neurology.Pediatric fellowship or equivalent experience. Minimum number of years and type of relevant workexperience: Anticipated Begin Date: Job no: 90493-ASWork type: Faculty Full or Part Time, Faculty-Full Time,Faculty-Part TimeDepartment: SMPH/NEUROLOGY/NEUROLOGYLocation: MadisonCategories: Health Care, Medical, Social Services,Instructional, Research, Scientific Licensed or eligible for Wisconsin medical license. FTE: The Department of Neurology at the University of Wisconsin Schoolof Medicine and Public Health seeks pediatric neurologists to joinour expanding Pediatric Neurology and Comprehensive EpilepsyPrograms at UW Hospitals, American Family Children’s Hospital andUW Health clinics. The positions includes opportunities forteaching, clinical and research activities in an academicenvironment with pediatric and adult epileptologists, generalpediatric neurologists, faculty in other services includingpediatrics, neuropsychology, neurosurgery, neuroradiology, clinicalneurophysiology and basic science research faculty. NOTE: A Period of Evaluation will be Required A535100-MEDICAL SCHOOL/NEUROLOGY/NEUROLOGY Official Title: Kathleen [email protected] Please upload a CV/resume and cover letter referring to thePosition Vacancy Listing number. At a future date you may be askedto provide at least three letters of reference.The deadline for assuring full consideration is October 5, 2017,however positions will remain open and applications may beconsidered until the position is filled. OCTOBER 10, 2017 50% – 100% Additional Information: Degree and area of specialization: Relay Access (WTRS): 7-1-1 (out-of-state: TTY: 800.947.3529, STS:800.833.7637) and above Phone number (See RELAY_SERVICE for furtherinformation. ) Position Summary:last_img read more

School resource officer arrests man with two guns

first_imgColumbus, IN — A Columbus Police Department (CPD) school resource officer assigned to a Columbus middle school arrested a man with two concealed firearms Wednesday after he was spotted by the officer on school property. Columbus Chief of Police, Michael Richardson stated, “I would like to commend the officer for his swift actions today. This is just one example of why we have veteran law enforcement officers in our Columbus schools. By being proactive, rather than reactive, Officer Ross was able to investigate and confront a potential threat to student safety and arrest the suspect without incident.”Around 11:15 am, CPD School Resource Officer Greg Ross observed a man, later identified as Michael K. Jones, 38, of Columbus, acting suspiciously around vehicles in the Central Middle School staff parking area. Ross made contact with Jones and took him into custody after determining that he was in possession of two handguns that were loaded and concealed on his person. Jones was transported to the Bartholomew County Jail where he was charged on an allegation of Possession of a Firearm on School Property.Detectives from the Columbus Police Department are assisting with this ongoing investigation.last_img read more

Phoebe Shows Her Dark, Icy Face

first_imgPlanetary scientists are reveling in the sharp new pictures of Phoebe taken last Friday by the Cassini Spacecraft.  Phoebe is the outermost moon of Saturn, an oddball since it revolves around Saturn in the “wrong” direction at high inclination.  Nine images have been released to the public so far (click here for the gallery).  The high-resolution images, like this one, are a thousand times better than what Voyager took 23 years ago.    Phoebe is four times farther out than Iapetus, the next-outermost moon.  Some of the craters are so large, the impacts must have come close to smashing the body apart.  The big one is 62 miles across, almost half the diameter of the moon, and it has slopes leading 12 miles down to the crater floor.    Phoebe appears to be an ice-rich body with a coating of dark material that may be up to 1600 feet thick.  Preliminary indications suggest it is similar to Kuiper-Belt Objects (KBO) like those seen beyond Neptune, but some scientists are not sure.  More will be known once the density and composition have been determined by infrared, ultraviolet and radio science observations which are still being processed.Update 06/25/2004: Project scientists reported the density is 1.59, above that of water ice but below that of rock.  The surface material contains ferrous iron and, surprisingly, carbon dioxide mixed with other unknown material.  Impacts all seem to punch through a dark layer into lighter subsurface material.  Best guesses at this point is that Phoebe is indeed a captured Kuiper Belt Object similar to Pluto or Triton.  If so, it could be exuding volatiles from the surface or below, but so far, ultraviolet measurements have not detected any emissions.  It does not look like the other icy moons of Saturn, nor does it look like an asteroid.  Interdisciplinary scientist Torrence Johnson doubts that Phoebe is the source of the dark material on Iapetus.  For more information on these results released at a press conference at JPL June 23, see the Cassini media resources page.    Now warmed up after its spectacularly successful flyby of Phoebe, the Cassini spacecraft is in excellent health as it accelerates toward its Saturn orbit insertion June 30 – July 1, a critical maneuver vital to the remainder of the mission.  It will be Cassini’s closest encounter with Saturn and its rings.  First images may be reported shortly after 5:00 a.m. PDT July 1.This is just a foretaste of even greater and more spectacular encounters ahead.  Cassini, with its Huygens probe that will parachute to the Titan’s surface on January 14, is poised to be one of the great historical voyages of exploration.  Now, after nearly seven years in flight it is on the verge of reaching its destination: the planet Saturn, with its 31 moons, rings, magnetosphere and mysterious large moon Titan.  Watch for news of the orbit insertion on June 30 and its closest-ever flight over Saturn’s magnificent rings.(Visited 6 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

NAHB Annual Conference Wraps Up 2011 Event in Orlando

first_imgIt seems to me that most trade conferences have settled into a consistent rhythm—pre-conference classes and committee meetings, a trade show that lasts several days with a show floor and short seminars that attendees move between, and one or two big speeches that resemble tent revivals. I recently attended the International Builders Show, AKA IBS (which Leah Thayer pointed out also stands for irritable bowel syndrome), in Orlando, Florida. IBS used to be enormous—you could spend days walking the show floor and not see everything. Unfortunately for NAHB—but fortunately for attendees—the housing industry downturn has led to a much smaller and more manageable show.The good, the bad, the ugly, and a few just plain silly productsI spent a good portion of my three days in Orlando on the show floor, checking out both new and old products, and ran across a few that I think deserve mention. Just for fun, I’ll start with the silly stuff, some of which falls into the bad and ugly categories. Among the usual collection of windows, insulation, and other building products, I ran across a couple of very strange booths. My favorite goofy item was the plastic Tiki Hut structure on display. Close behind that was the booth full of enormous bronze sculptures. Other choice items were two different vinyl siding companies with “log” patterns, and plantation shutters with tiny little solar panels on each louver.On the good side, I ran across a product from Tech-Wood—a wood-polypropylene composite, available in lap siding and railing patterns, that looks promising. I was also impressed by the dedication to healthy housing shown by Push Design, a North Carolina company that specializes in natural building materials and techniques, including hemp insulation imported from England. I liked the Huber Engineered Woods booth, full of cool demonstrations of Zip System products’ performance. Zip System is apparently very well tested, although I still have some concerns about quality control in the field, as I do with most moisture management products. Ultra-Aire exhibited a line of whole house dehumidifiers with outside air intakes and MERV 8 filters. All units are ENERGY STAR rated and look promising, particularly for high-performance homes in humid climates. Cosella-Dorken continues to expand its Delta line of moisture management products, including new weather barriers and flashing tapes.Lightly attended seminarsI sat in on several seminars, most of which were sparsely attended. It may have been wishful thinking, but most of the sessions were held in rooms that were often more than 75% empty. Peter Pfeiffer and John Freer gave a solid talk on Effective Green Building and Design, providing both the architect’s and the contractor’s views on how to accomplish high-performance homes. Another presentation by Steve Bertasso about cost-effective green practices in affordable housing was basic, but mostly accurate. I appreciated the fact that he gave a pretty reasonable estimate of the cost of certification rather than throw out a lowball figure like many people do. Another good presentation about green scopes of work by Foster Lyons was eerily familiar to one I give about trade contractor management, but I guess great minds just think alike.The best presentations had the fewest presenters. One of the big problems I have with most conferences is the inconsistent quality of the seminars. There is too much beginner-level information, too much repetition, and—since few speakers are paid for their time, let alone their expenses—the quality is inconsistent.The verdictAs much as NAHB doesn’t like it, I think a smaller show is a better one. The show floor, while large, was still manageable, and people who came for a day had enough time to see just about everything. I think the seminar structure needs a major reworking to include fewer concurrent sessions and eliminate duplication. I would like to see more advanced sessions, and sets of sessions that combine into specific subject tracks that build on each other to provide a solid block of information. If I was in charge (and let’s be thankful I’m not), I would have fewer live seminars, have them all streaming live on the web as well as available for later viewing, keep the show floor size down, and move it to a better city—one that doesn’t require taxis and buses to get everywhere. It’s time for trade shows to rethink their structure and look for alternative ways to deliver their message, provide benefit for attendees, and make money.last_img read more