Rivers United’s Resurgence Continues with Comfortable 2-0 Away Win

first_imgRivers United are showing a new lease of life, securing back to back wins for the second time this season and move to third following Sunday’s road victory over Adamawa United. rivers united Stanley Eguma’s men cruised to a comfortable 2-0 win away from home, their second this season, with goals from Junior Osaghae (25′) and Malachi Ohawuma (87′). The result means Rivers United have now picked 18 points, same as Lobi Stars after their narrow 1-0 defeat to Akwa United. Meanwhile, league leaders Plateau United saw their lead narrowed to just three points as they failed to pick any on Sunday, falling to a heavy 3-0 defeat to Abia Warriors. Read Also:Rivers United eyes comeback against Rangers Match Day 11 Full Results:Advertisement Promoted ContentBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of Anime12 Countries With The Most Impressive Technological Innovations14 Hilarious Comics Made By Women You Need To Follow Right NowTop 10 TV Characters Meant To Be Iconic6 Ridiculous Health Myths That Are Actually True5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This YearA Soviet Shot Put Thrower’s Record Hasn’t Been Beaten To This DayCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable WayThe Highest Paid Football Players In The World7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend Better Abia Warriors 3-0 Plateau United Adamawa United 0-2 Rivers United Akwa United 1-0 Lobi Stars FC Ifeanyi Ubah 1-0 Heartland Katsina United 3-2 Jigawa GS Sunshine Stars 1-1 Dakkada FC Warri Wolves 2-1 Kwara United FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 center_img Loading… last_img read more

McDowell calls for schedule change

first_img As well as playing the Ryder Cup in even-numbered years, the top US players take on an International team in the Presidents Cup in odd-numbered years. ” I think it’s difficult for a lot of the stalwart Americans who play year-in, year-out, Presidents Cup and Ryder Cup,” McDowell said ahead of the 40th Ryder Cup at Gleneagles, which gets under way on Friday. Press Association “I’ve spoken to a few of them and they are of the belief that this needs to be every three years so that they can play a Ryder Cup and a Presidents Cup and have a year off. I would be a supporter of that. “I think for their level of engagement they need that, because when you look at the likes of Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson, Steve Stricker and Jim Furyk who have played eight, nine, 10, 12 of these in a row, they do lose their shine. “This event has become such a global spectacle and such a huge passion, emotional week, we want them to be as into it as we are.” American captain Tom Watson said he still favoured the Ryder Cup being played every two years, but admitted that he was concerned with the amount of golf being played before this year’s contest. Watson successfully lobbied for a week off before Gleneagles to be included in this year’s PGA Tour schedule, meaning the four FedEx Cup play-off events were played in consecutive weeks. ” I am concerned about how much these players are playing before they reach the Ryder Cup, I’m very concerned about that,” the 65-year-old said. “Two years ago I made my point to Ted Bishop (PGA of America president) and to Tim Finchem (PGA Tour commissioner) about a week off between the end of the FedExCup. “These players are playing seven out of eight tournaments or eight out of nine tournaments in a row. They are tired. That’s too much golf.” center_img Graeme McDowell believes the Ryder Cup should be played once every three years to take account of the demands placed on American players.last_img read more

Cornerback Cordy steps in after injuries to secondary, records 1st career interception

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on November 22, 2014 at 9:15 pm Contact Jesse: [email protected] | @dougherty_jesse PITTSBURGH — Antwan Cordy didn’t try and pretend to be something he’s not.After seeing his most action of the season and playing a bulk of the second half due to upper-body injuries to Julian Whigham and Corey Winfield and Wayne Morgan still out, the freshman cornerback said he was both exhausted and overwhelmed.But he did seize his opportunity in a game that Syracuse head Scott Shafer said would be a good chance to look at the Orange’s younger players.“I felt like I came out and did what I had to do,” Cordy said after Syracuse lost to Pittsburgh, 30-7, on Saturday. “I just wanted to show that I can be a true freshman.”On a night when the Orange (3-8, 1-6 Atlantic Coast) couldn’t do much against the Panthers (5-6, 3-4), Cordy gave a quick look into the secondary’s future with his fill-in performance at Heinz Field. He intercepted a pass at the end of the first half to keep Pittsburgh from burying SU early, and collected four total tackles, the most of any cornerback.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I was happy for Antwan Cordy,” SU head coach Scott Shafer said. “He did a nice job in the kicking game for us, kind of an unsung hero, and when Winfield and Whigham went down with upper-body injuries, he got thrown in there and they went right at him, just like they always do.“They went right at the young corner and he did a nice job, which was good to see.”SU sophomore quarterback Mitch Kimble had just been intercepted by linebacker Bam Bradley and the Panthers had 32 seconds to stretch its lead to 24 points before the half.Pitt quarterback Chad Voytik dropped back and looked for wideout Dontez Ford in the left corner of the end zone, but Cordy knocked the ball out of Ford’s hands and snatched it out of the air while tapping his feet inside the white chalk.He came out of the half lining up on the opposite side of Brandon Reddish as SU’s second cornerback.With less than five minutes remaining in the third quarter, Voytik gift wrapped Cordy’s second interception of the game with Pittsburgh marching deep into SU territory. But the pass hit Cordy’s chest and then the Heinz Field grass, leaving the freshman face down on the field before Chris Blewitt came on to hit a 31-yard field goal to give the Panthers a 20-7 lead.But as a whole, there was more growing than growing pains.“I was honestly thinking about scoring and took my eyes off it,” Cordy said. “But I think it was my only real big mistake of the night.” Commentslast_img read more

My questions for Michael Mukasey

first_imgOn Sept. 14, 2001, Congress authorized the use of force against those who committed or were implicated in the attacks three days before. President Bush praised Congress vaguely, for “taking this action.” Notice he did not praise it for authorizing force. Perhaps he believes that to call Congress’ action “authorization” would suggest that authorization was constitutionally necessary. Was it? In 1952, President Truman, to prevent a strike during wartime, seized the steel mills. The Supreme Court declared unconstitutional this supposed exercise of the president’s inherent powers as commander in chief. Justice Robert Jackson wrote: “No penance would ever expiate the sin against free government of holding that a president can escape control of executive powers by law through assuming his military role.” What limits can Congress place on that role? In his new book Takeover: The Return of the Imperial Presidency and the Subversion of American Democracy, Charlie Savage of The Boston Globe notes that when in 1996, “Congress banned placing U.S. troops under United Nations command, Clinton declared that he could bypass the law under his power, as commander in chief, to decide how best to structure the military’s hierarchy of command.” Do you agree? The Constitution’s framers, disliking the British sovereign’s “prerogative power” to set aside a law for a claimed public good, stipulated that the president shall “take care that the laws be faithfully executed.” But consider “signing statements,” whereby presidents, when signing legislation, attach statements sometimes directing the executive branch not to execute certain portions. This practice is, in effect, something the Constitution does not permit – a line-item veto. Savage, who won a Pulitzer Prize for his reporting on this president’s signing statements, writes that such statements were rare until the mid-1980s, when some conservatives urged the frequent use of them as a means of maximizing presidential powers. Savage says: “If a president has the power to instruct the government not to enforce laws that he alone has declared to be unconstitutional, then he could free himself from the need to obey laws that restrict his own actions.” Is this a real danger? Attorneys general serve at the pleasure of the presidents who choose them, but swear to uphold the Constitution. Mukasey has been chosen by a president who has been more aggressive than any other in asserting what Theodore Roosevelt called the “residuum of powers” inherent in the presidency. Mukasey might have to serve the nation by displeasing this president. Michael Mukasey, the retired judge nominated to be attorney general, is called a “law and order” conservative. That description is, however, not especially informative now that the Bush administration’s sweeping claims of presidential powers have unsettled some understandings of what the law is. The following questions, if asked at Mukasey’s Senate confirmation hearings, might reveal whether he considers some of these claims extravagant. The Bush administration says “the long war” – the war on terror – is a perpetual emergency that will last for generations. Waged against us largely by non-state actors, it will not end with a legally clarifying and definitive surrender. The administration regards America as a battlefield, on which even an American citizen can be seized as an “enemy combatant” and detained indefinitely. You ruled that presidents have this power, but you were reversed on appeal. What do you think was the flaw in the reasoning of the court that reversed you? If the Senate musters 60 votes to pass Jim Webb’s bill requiring that the deployments of troops in Iraq be no longer than their out-of-theater respites, the president almost certainly will veto it as not only unfeasible but an unconstitutional abridgement of the president’s exclusive powers as commander in chief. James Madison, however, wrote: “Those who are to conduct a war cannot in the nature of things be proper or safe judges whether a war ought to be commenced, continued, or concluded. They are barred from the latter functions by a great principle in free government, analogous to that which separates the sword from the purse, or the power of executing from the power of enacting laws.” Could Bush correctly veto Webb’s legislation on constitutional grounds? In 1991, the Senate voted 52-47 to authorize expelling Iraqi forces from Kuwait. Dick Cheney later said that if Congress had refused to authorize force, “From a constitutional standpoint, we had all the authority we needed,” meaning the president’s exclusive power to conduct foreign affairs. Do you agree? George Will’s e-mail address is [email protected] local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more