Stay or Go? Confused with Wanderlust

first_imgDear Mountain Mama,I received an offer to work full time as a sales rep for a local outdoor company. It’s a dream come true for me — traveling, meeting  outdoorsy people, and selling a great product.The only hitch is that my parents say they will cut me off if I accept. I’m in my mid-twenties and have two years left of college. My parents pay for school and rent, and they say it’s now or never. They’re threatening to cut me off entirely if I take this job.Thanks, Confused with WanderlustDear Confused with Wanderlust,A few times in the course of our lives the universe dishes up a life-defining opportunity. The chance presents living out our grandest dreams. When this happens, we must have the courage to go.Wanderlust, ask yourself if this is one of those opportunities. You’re an adult now and will figure out how to pay rent. Being responsible for you own bills might seem like a drag at first. But that also means you don’t have to ask for approval for your career choices. You don’t have to follow a path that makes others feel comfortable about what they perceive to be the track to success. You don’t have to measure your life by diplomas or bank account statements.If this is truly what you want to do, go for it! Oh Wanderlust, think of the places you will go! The rivers you’ll paddle and mountains you’ll climb! And you’ll meet people along the way, some will become lifelong friends and others will be one-time adventure partners. People will open up their homes to you and lend you outdoor gear. Along the way, you’ll develop the skills and confidence to stand on your own two feet and trust your decisions.It’s scary. There will be long days of talking to people who don’t buy what you have to sell. You’ll be tired and far away from home. But the risk of opting for security over adventure is scarier. Wanderlust, don’t end up saddled with a mortgage payment, stuck behind a computer screen, and sitting in a cubicle located in a city you hate living in just because if feels safe. You don’t want to end up with regrets about the things you could have done but were too afraid to do.Wanderlust, nourish that adventurous spirit! Enjoy sunrises, thunderstorms, blizzards, blissfully bluebird skies, and sunsets on a constantly changing horizon.Yours,Mountain MamaGot a question for Mountain Mama? Send it herelast_img read more

Cornerback Cordy steps in after injuries to secondary, records 1st career interception

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on November 22, 2014 at 9:15 pm Contact Jesse: [email protected] | @dougherty_jesse PITTSBURGH — Antwan Cordy didn’t try and pretend to be something he’s not.After seeing his most action of the season and playing a bulk of the second half due to upper-body injuries to Julian Whigham and Corey Winfield and Wayne Morgan still out, the freshman cornerback said he was both exhausted and overwhelmed.But he did seize his opportunity in a game that Syracuse head Scott Shafer said would be a good chance to look at the Orange’s younger players.“I felt like I came out and did what I had to do,” Cordy said after Syracuse lost to Pittsburgh, 30-7, on Saturday. “I just wanted to show that I can be a true freshman.”On a night when the Orange (3-8, 1-6 Atlantic Coast) couldn’t do much against the Panthers (5-6, 3-4), Cordy gave a quick look into the secondary’s future with his fill-in performance at Heinz Field. He intercepted a pass at the end of the first half to keep Pittsburgh from burying SU early, and collected four total tackles, the most of any cornerback.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I was happy for Antwan Cordy,” SU head coach Scott Shafer said. “He did a nice job in the kicking game for us, kind of an unsung hero, and when Winfield and Whigham went down with upper-body injuries, he got thrown in there and they went right at him, just like they always do.“They went right at the young corner and he did a nice job, which was good to see.”SU sophomore quarterback Mitch Kimble had just been intercepted by linebacker Bam Bradley and the Panthers had 32 seconds to stretch its lead to 24 points before the half.Pitt quarterback Chad Voytik dropped back and looked for wideout Dontez Ford in the left corner of the end zone, but Cordy knocked the ball out of Ford’s hands and snatched it out of the air while tapping his feet inside the white chalk.He came out of the half lining up on the opposite side of Brandon Reddish as SU’s second cornerback.With less than five minutes remaining in the third quarter, Voytik gift wrapped Cordy’s second interception of the game with Pittsburgh marching deep into SU territory. But the pass hit Cordy’s chest and then the Heinz Field grass, leaving the freshman face down on the field before Chris Blewitt came on to hit a 31-yard field goal to give the Panthers a 20-7 lead.But as a whole, there was more growing than growing pains.“I was honestly thinking about scoring and took my eyes off it,” Cordy said. “But I think it was my only real big mistake of the night.” Commentslast_img read more

Shoah Foundation’s film nominated for best short

first_imgThe team interviews Xia Shuqin about her experiences during the Nanjing Massacre in the late 1930s. (Photo courtesy of the Shoah Foundation)The USC Shoah Foundation’s documentary on the 1938 Nanjing Massacre, “A Girl and the Picture,” was nominated for best short film by the International Documentary Association in late October. Directed and produced by Academy Award winner Vanessa Roth and Shoah Foundation Executive Director Stephen Smith, the film follows the life of Xia Shuqin, an 89-year-old survivor, as she describes her story facing the Nanjing Massacre.“‘The Girl and The Picture’ is about the importance of bearing witness,” Smith said in an email to the Daily Trojan. “By focusing on Madame Xia’s relationship with her granddaughter and great grandson, the film underscores the importance of transferring the memory of an atrocity from one generation to another. The film binds their families across cultures and continents and highlights their shared commitment to preserving the memory of what happened.”The film was created over the course of six months and screened at various events, including Tribeca  and American Documentary film festivals. The creators hope that its message will impact international audiences, as they made many edits to the film to ensure its cultural legitimacy and accuracy, according to Roth. “I wanted to make sure that the domestic and international audience felt I was respecting and telling an authentic story,” Roth said. “I [didn’t] want it to feel disingenuous, I want to make sure that they feel proud about the story that they shared with me.”The story is special because it focuses on the specifics of a few characters, Roth said. Instead of integrating Madame Xia’s story into a broader history, Roth felt that the film would be more effective if it related to audiences through an authentic human experience.“My interest in [the film] was in making sure we made a film that was very human and personal to them,” she said. “We wanted to make a film through the lens of individual people … and translate that to being a story about the bigger moments in history.”The international award recognizes world-class non-fiction films and documentaries, and each nominated film expands on the compassion and interconnectedness of the human experience, according to the IDA’s mission statement. “The nomination is a welcome endorsement of our commitment to ensuring that the Nanjing Massacre doesn’t fade from collective memory, or become whitewashed by revisionist narratives,” Rob Kuznia, the Shoah Foundation’s external relations coordinator, said in an email to the Daily Trojan. However, according to Smith, the award does more than just recognize the efforts of the team. It’s also a sign that the international documentary society deemed it an important cultural resource and is encouraging the USC Shoah Foundation to continue its efforts in historical preservation. “We aren’t in this for awards,” Smith said. “We play the long game, and plan to preserve and share the personal stories of Madame Xia and other survivors of the Nanjing Massacre — be it via this film, or through their testimonies — in perpetuity, no matter what.”The award for best short film will be announced Dec. 8.last_img read more