Columbus Crew return to Ohio State to honor Connor Senn

For players participating in Tuesday’s Connor Senn Memorial soccer game between the Ohio State men’s soccer team and the Columbus Crew, the event is more than an exhibition match. The charity event, which honors former OSU soccer player Connor Senn who collapsed on the field of play and died hours later, transcends sport, said Columbus Crew coach Robert Warzycha. On Sept. 26, 2001, Senn, a then-18-year-old freshman, collapsed on the field during a game at Akron. The cause of death was determined to be a congenital heart defect that, at the time, went undetected. “I would call (Senn) more of a family member,” Warzycha said. “He was a soccer player, we all play soccer. It’s very important for us to be at this game. This is something that we all remember and it raises awareness of what happened on the field and raises money for the cause.” The charity match was established in 2002 and will be back Tuesday for the 11th time. The event raises awareness for sudden cardiac arrest in athletes with proceeds benefiting the Connor Senn Memorial Fund and the Dorothy M. Davis Heart & Lung Research Institute at OSU’s Wexner Medical Center, according to ohiostatebuckeyes.com. For the first nine years of the game, OSU took on the Crew. Last year, though, the Crew elected not to play in the charity match. Crew technical director Brian Bliss told The Lantern in May 2011 that playing in the Connor Senn Memorial Match would cost the club $10,000 because of the Major League Soccer Players Union’s most recently ratified collective-bargaining agreement, which stipulates that MLS clubs can schedule only one non-league “free game” per season. The Crew had already scheduled an international friendly against Premier League’s Newcastle United to be played on July 26, so OSU instead hosted the Dayton Dutch Lions of the United Soccer Leagues. The Buckeyes lost to the Dutch Lions, 3-1, May 2. This year, the Crew returns to take on the Buckeyes and OSU coach John Bluem said having them back is an important factor for both teams. “It’s neat. It’s the pro team in town playing against Ohio State University men’s Division I team,” Bluem said. “The Crew really add that little bit of extra juice to it.” Bluem said he’s looking for his team to go out and show that they can keep up with the pros. He also said he would like to have the opportunity to play everyone on the team, but the bench might see limited action in this contest. “We want to show that we’re a good team. We’re going to put out there who we think is the best group and play them for as much of the game as possible,” Bluem said. “Hopefully we can go about 70 to 75 minutes and it’s a good game and it’s close.” Former OSU and current Crew goalkeeper Matt Lampson previously played in the game as a Buckeye from 2008-2011 and said he’s not going to take the game lightly. “I’m excited about it and I’m going to be honest, I want to make it not close … You would think that I would have some sort of compassion for my alma mater, but unfortunately,” Lampson said, pausing while a grin spread across his face, “it’s not there. This is my job now and I gotta go out and do it.” Lampson said when he wore scarlet and gray, OSU often went into the match hoping to make it close but quickly realized they would be outplayed by the pros. He said he’s expecting this year’s match to play out in similar fashion. “When I played with OSU, they would say things like, ‘All right we’re going to go out and play against these guys,’” Lampson said. “And we would try for about five minutes and then we were like, ‘Well, they’re way better. Lets hang back a little bit.’ That’s what I’m expecting, for them to hang back and not attack so much.” Warzycha said he plans on starting players that don’t normally crack the Crew’s starting lineup, but added that everyone on the Crew could have a chance to play. “We’ll see how the game goes and everybody is going to be on the bench, so if we need to use somebody, then they’ll go in and play,” Warzycha said. Regardless of the outcome, Bluem said he is proud of what the game has become, grateful the Crew have agreed to be a part of it and said there is a lesson that can be learned from all of it. “Life is precious. Sudden cardiac death is a scary thing that can happen in athletics and in general walks of life. The Columbus Crew have been unbelievable as a partner for the last 11 years,” he said. “Our goal now is through research and education, which we can now fund, to prevent sudden cardiac death.” Tuesday’s game kicks off at 7 p.m. at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. Tickets are $5 for adults and $3 for children and students and can be purchased online at OhioStateBuckeyes.com or by calling 1-800-GO-BUCKS. Pat Brennan contributed to this article. read more

Ohio State mens wrestling readying itself for National Duals after loss to

The No. 5 Ohio State wrestling team is trying to bounce back after losing its regular season finale against No. 1 Penn State, 29-18, as it heads into the 2013 NWCA/Cliff Keen “Mat Mayhem” National Duals. The Buckeyes, which received an automatic bid to the event’s finals because they are among the top four returning dual-meet teams, finished the regular season 11-3 and 5-3 in the Big Ten. The automatic bid finalists were awarded based on their performance and rankings from the 2011-2012 season. OSU sophomore Hunter Stieber, ranked No. 2 in the 141-pound weight class, said that he likes the team’s chances in the postseason. “I feel pretty good,” he said. “Team-wise, I think we’ll be all right. We bounce back pretty well. We’re an older team so it should be good.” The Division I National Duals will feature a new format this year with eight teams in the finals instead of the traditional four. The addition of four automatic bid finalists increases the initial pool of competitors from 16 to 20. The teams that did not receive automatic bids are divided up into four different regions: Cornell University Region: Cornell, Hofstra, Virginia, Nebraska Kent State University Region: Kent State, Oklahoma State, Northern Iowa, Wisconsin Oregon State University Region: Oregon State, Oklahoma, Virginia Tech, Michigan University of Missouri Region: Missouri, Maryland, Wyoming, Purdue The automatic bid finalists are Ohio State, Iowa, Minnesota and Illinois. Each region will host a one-day competition Sunday. The winners will move on to join the four automatic bid teams at the University of Minnesota for the finals on Feb. 22-23 in Minneapolis. Sophomore 149-pounder Cam Tessari said he is looking to pick up where he left off coming off a big 3-1 win against then-No. 7-ranked sophomore Andrew Alton of Penn State. “I’m excited for it (the National Duals),” he said. “I was a little rocky at the beginning of the season but I think I’m starting to hit my stride.” OSU coach Tom Ryan said there are a few kinks the team needs to work out between now and the tournament, but he has high hopes. “I feel great about this team,” he said. “Up and down the lineup we have good guys. We have to fight a little harder, but we’re going to be ready to go.” Last year, OSU failed to make the finals of the National Duals when it lost to Oklahoma State in Stillwater, Okla. This year, they’ll look to avenge that loss. The Buckeyes’ first match is set to start at 6 p.m. on Feb. 22 at Williams Arena in Minneapolis, Minn. The finals will conclude Feb. 23. read more

Ohio State field hockey splits weekend slate

OSU freshman midfielder/forward Maddy Humphrey makes a play on the ball during a game against Ball State Sept. 14. at Buckeye Varsity Field. OSU won 3-2 in OTCredit: Melissa Prax / Lantern photographerTwo first-half goals from freshman midfielder Maddy Humphrey propelled Ohio State field hockey to a 3-1 victory against the Kent State Golden Flashes Sunday afternoon.Humphrey opened the scoring with a breakaway finish one-on-one with Kent State sophomore goalkeeper Andrea Rinehart just a little more than two minutes into the game at Buckeye Varsity Field.Three minutes later, she struck again, scoring on a rebound from junior back Emma Royce’s penalty corner shot.The early lead gave OSU (5-8, 0-4) the confidence to stay aggressive throughout the game against Kent State. Buckeye coach Anne Wilkinson said the team fed off the energy of Humphrey’s early goals.“They’re not playing like they’re behind the eight ball,” Wilkinson said of her team playing from ahead. “You just see (freshman forward) Annabel Sams and (freshman midfielder) Morgan Kile taking off with speed, and their speed kills.”OSU dominated in shots, 24-7, and penalty corners, 15-4, Sunday. It took Kent State (5-8) until the 17-minute mark of the second half for the Golden Flashes to pick up their first penalty corner opportunity.With momentum appearing to swing toward Kent State, Wilkinson called a timeout to regroup with 15:27 left in the game while nursing a 2-0 lead.Sams came out of the timeout and dribbled coast-to-coast to score an unassisted goal, giving OSU a 3-0 advantage.“I think we were one today,” Sams said. “And that showed. I think we had good connections and once we got the ball, we were really an attacking force.”Kent State got on the board with 11:52 remaining on a tip-in goal from senior forward Hannah Faulkner. The goal was Faulkner’s 10th of the season, but came too late in a game where OSU refused to give up possession.Humphrey’s two goals gave her 11 for the season as a part of her 30 points total, which both lead the team. Humphrey said she was pleased with the performance, but added the team needs to convert more on its penalty corner opportunities.“We unfortunately didn’t finish a lot of our corners today, which we’ll work on,” Humphrey said. “But just keep attacking and attacking (was) the mentality. They were getting frustrated and it kept pumping us up to shoot more.”The Buckeyes’ Sunday triumph came two days after they fell in a conference matchup.OSU couldn’t manage to get its first Big Ten victory Friday in Piscataway, N.J., against conference newcomer Rutgers.The Buckeyes and Scarlet Knights were tied at halftime, 1-1, when Rutgers (6-7, 1-4) went on a quick scoring spurt to put OSU away.Redshirt-sophomore midfielder Alyssa Bull took a cross in front of the cage from sophomore forward Rachel Yaney and finished to give Rutgers a 2-1 lead.Five minutes later, junior forward Katie Champion put the game out of reach, scoring on an assist from sophomore forward Jasmine Cole.OSU added a late goal from Royce, but ultimately fell, 3-2.Wilkinson said the team has to be more physical if they want to make a late run in the Big Ten Tournament in November.OSU is set to face Indiana on Friday in Bloomington, Ind., at 3 p.m. before taking on Iowa on Sunday at Buckeye Varsity Field at noon. read more

Buckeye baseball tops Toledo 92 for 15th win of the season

Redshirt-sophomore infielder L Grant Davis (right)​ secures first base during a game against Toledo on March 24 at Bill Davis Stadium. OSU won, 9-2. Credit: Stacie Jackson / Lantern photographerAfter a slow start in February, the Ohio State baseball team is surging through March.Balance across the field has continued to be the theme for the Buckeyes, as they tallied their 15th win of the season Tuesday afternoon with a 9-2 win against the Toledo Rockets at Bill Davis Stadium.  Freshman pitcher Jacob Niggemeyer started on the mound for the Buckeyes and picked up the win after giving up just two runs in 6.0 innings of work.The Rockets kept it close through five innings after initially taking a 1-0 lead in the first. But OSU tacked on six runs between the sixth, seventh and eighth innings to seal the win.“We got off to a slow start, but we finished really strong,” coach Greg Beals.The game shifted for the Buckeyes when junior Jake Post took the mound.“Once we went to the bullpen we really gained control of the ball game,” Beals said.Senior catcher Connor Sabanosh was quick to credit Post’s performance after he tossed 1.2 innings and gave up just one hit.“We always have faith in Jake, every time he comes in we feel like we are going to have a shutdown inning,” Sabanosh said. “Once he came in we really added on the last three innings. It allowed us (the field players) to settle and just play and let Jake do his thing.”The Buckeye offensive domination started in the bottom of the fourth with a home run by junior infielder Troy Kuhn.OSU continued to excel in the batters box with a couple two-out hits.“We got quality at-bats late in the game and got a lot of two out hits,” Beals said. “Those are big difference makers on the scoreboard, because you either get the two out hit and score the run or you don’t and the innings over.”The top of batting order has continued to be the offensive leader for the Buckeyes, working off the bats of Sabanosh and sophomore centerfielder Troy Montgomery. Montgomery has hits in 13-consecutive games and has reached base safely in 16-consecutive games, both being the sophomore’s career bests. Sabanosh has also reached base safely in 15-consecutive games.But the stats are not Sabanosh’s main concern, he said.“I try not to look at stats or anything. I know when I feel well and I try to just not think at all and play simple baseball,” Sabanosh said. “But it’s always nice to get a couple hits in a game.”Montgomery added that he too is not concerned with the stats, but more focused on doing his job to help the team win.“I’m the lead off hitter so anything I can do to get on base, maybe steal some bags and score a few runs then I feel like I’m doing my job,” Montgomery said.Even though Montgomery and Sabanosh are clicking consistently with their bats, the true success has come from the Buckeyes’ balance across the offense, Beals said.“All nine spots on our line up got a hit today and that makes it tough on a pitching staff, when you are able to get something all the way top to bottom in your lineup,” he said.OSU will look to continue their offensive momentum as they take on the Akron Zips on Wednesday at 5:05 p.m. read more

That title wouldnt make for much of a campaign sl

first_imgThat title wouldn’t make for much of a campaign slogan, and yet, it’s the natural outcome of one particular politician’s promise. Most of the notes I receive about the Affordable Health Care Act, or Obamacare, are first-person accounts of how a reader’s change in coverage or cost is affecting his life. These stories prompted several discussions with Andy Mangione, vice president of government relations of the Association of Mature American Citizens (AMAC). Andy serves as the lead legislative and government contact for AMAC in Washington, DC. He’s also responsible for national grassroots outreach and developing strategic partnerships. Andy is AMAC’s man on the scene in Washington, and he kindly agreed to sit down for an interview on the significant budget cuts to home health care that have been made as a result of Obamacare. I’ll let Andy get into the details.Dennis Miller: Welcome, Andy. Thanks for taking the time to educate our readers on the latest goings-on in Washington.Andy Mangione: My pleasure, Dennis.Dennis: Andy, let’s get right to it. I know you’re very concerned about how cuts to home health care will impact seniors. This is no longer a theoretical problem. I’d like to ask a two-part question: Can you tell our readers a bit about your organization and how these budget cuts will affect “mature American citizens?”Andy: Dan Weber, a private citizen, founded AMAC as an alternative to and competitor of AARP. AMAC is a right-of-center, conservative member benefits and senior advocacy organization for Americans age 50 and older. AMAC offers many of the same benefits and services as AARP. The biggest difference, though, is our approach to advocacy. AMAC is a member-driven organization. We do not sit in a boardroom and determine our stance on issues unilaterally. We take our marching orders from our members. They determine the issues that I bring to Washington, DC and help us to determine our policy and issues positions. We have over 1.2 million American members living in all 50 states. We add approximately 1,000-2,000 new, dues-paying members each week. I think it’s important to describe the Medicare home healthcare recipient before getting into the cuts. The average age of this beneficiary is 82. Two-thirds live below the federal poverty level, and they have chronic illnesses like heart disease, COPD, and diabetes. These are Medicare’s oldest, sickest, and poorest beneficiaries. Most of these folks reside in rural areas, and the majority of them are women. The $22 billion cuts over four years to Medicare home health care will mean these homebound seniors will have to seek care outside of their homes. The cuts will also devastate the home healthcare sector. And where will the money from these cuts go? To fund subsidies on the insurance exchanges and to expand Medicaid—two key components of Obamacare.Dennis: I recently wrote an article about long-term care insurance, which many refer to as nursing home insurance. I pointed out that a major provision of long-term care is home health care, which is actually “avoid nursing home insurance.” If the government is cutting back on money for home health care, what options will be available for those who need care?Andy: They’ll be forced to receive care in nursing homes or other institutional settings, which greatly increases their cost and negatively affects their healthcare outcomes. Also, keep in mind that most recipients of Medicare home health care reside in rural areas and do not have the same choices for nursing home or other institutional care that those who live in urban areas do.Dennis: Won’t that further overload hospitals and nursing homes, which in turn will add to the overall costs?Andy: Absolutely. Medicare home health care saved the Medicare program $3 billion over the last three years. Expenditures for non-Medicare home health care will definitely rise since these patients will be treated in nursing homes and other institutions.Dennis: I don’t know of anyone who, given a choice, wouldn’t prefer to stay at home for care. What impact will these budget cuts have on the home healthcare industry?Andy: The Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) looked at these cuts and estimated that nearly 500,000 jobs in the home healthcare sector will be lost. They also estimate that 5,000 home healthcare companies will become insolvent as a result of these cuts by 2017.Dennis: You touched on something I hadn’t thought through before: the significant impact these cuts will have on working women and small-business owners. What can people do now? The budget cuts have already been passed. Is it too late?Andy: It’s not too late. H.R.5110, the SAVE Medicare Home Health Act, was recently introduced to rescind these cuts and replace them with commonsense accountability for home healthcare agencies, which would increase the quality of care for patients. The House will vote on the budget-neutral H.R.5110 in the fall, and if it passes—and it has a good chance of doing so—then it’s on to the Senate. If you would like to reach out to your Congressional representatives to urge them to support H.R.5110, please feel free to visit our home healthcare site. 90% of the businesses that provide home health care are small businesses. And, as I previously mentioned, CMS estimates that 5,000 of these businesses are at risk of closing their doors as a result of these cuts. Women own the majority of these businesses, and the majority of their employees—the nurses and other allied health professionals who provide care—are also women. CMS also estimated that 500,000 of these jobs are threatened by these cuts. That’s a lot of women-owned businesses and female employees drastically affected by these cuts. Also, the vast majority of the patients receiving home health care are women. Any way you evaluate it, these cuts to home health care disproportionately affect women in a very negative way.Dennis: I’d like to ask one question on a different topic. When I’ve written about Obamacare in the past, I’ve received three forms of feedback. The first was genuine concern, and the second was political criticism. Third, I heard from a large group that basically has a hard time believing it. Their sentiment was: “That just could not happen in America!” How do you respond to people who are having a hard time believing that Obamacare is going to have a major and possibly negative impact on their lives and their health care?Andy: I would say that elections have consequences. Not only can this happen in America, it already has happened! President Obama burst onto the national scene promising hope and change and certainly delivered on the “change” promise. Only it was not the change that most Americans were seeking. Like it or not—and AMAC members most definitely do not like it—Obamacare is now the law of the land. All is not lost, though. There’s always another federal election every two years, when Americans have the opportunity to right the ship and elect people who identify with their values and beliefs. Get involved and research candidates before giving your precious vote to an articulate, attractive candidate who looks great in a suit. Take the time to find the substance behind the style.Dennis: Andy, on behalf of all our readers, thanks for sharing your boots-on-the-ground input. Hopefully our subscribers will pitch in and let their elected representatives know how they feel. I should share that I’m a card-carrying member of AMAC. While there are several organizations that claim to represent seniors, I’ve found that most don’t represent my views well. AMAC doesn’t donate to political action committees, individual campaigns, or endorse candidates. It does listen to its members and work on issues of major concern. Like many laws, the details of Obamacare have emerged after the law was passed. If those details frighten you, make sure the organizations you belong to reflect that sentiment.On the Lighter Side When you read this, Jo and I will be in San Antonio at the Casey Summit. We’re both looking forward to visiting the Alamo and enjoying the San Antonio River Walk. If you’re attending, please flag me down and say hello. If not, you can listen to all of the compelling presentations on the Summit Audio Collection. I recommend preordering to take advantage of the sizable discount. And finally… Until next week…last_img read more

Most Important Broadcast Of 250 Million Traders

first_imgMost Important Broadcast Of $250 Million Trader’s 3-Decade Career This reclusive millionaire was the moneymaking expert Fortune 500 Executives from Boeing and Chevron turned to. But now, he’s doing something unlike anything done before… you may be shocked and blindsided. Think before you click here. — Details on the “next Bitcoin” – Buy this top crypto pick now This crypto has a market cap well under $100 million… but it recently flashed the same buy signal as two other cryptos that soared 208% in three months… and 1,522% in eight months. For the next few days only, you can get all the details here. Justin’s note: Today, I’m featuring a new essay from one of the best value investors in our business, Bonner Private Portfolio editor Chris Mayer.Longtime readers know it pays to listen to Chris’ advice. Over a 10-year span, he outperformed not only the S&P 500, but also legendary investors like Warren Buffett and Carl Icahn. Chris was able to do this by finding hidden pools of value in the market. Below, he shares a little-known secret to uncover these gems… By Chris Mayer, editor, Bonner Private Portfolio Hard as it is to believe, there’s a large group of “investors” out there who don’t care about the price of what they’re buying. They don’t care about earnings, dividends, or any of that. They buy, no matter what. And the result is a market full of over-loved and overvalued stocks. We deal in strange markets these days, with bizarre, distorted prices. Seriously, I’ll prove it. Take a look at Coca-Cola’s annual revenue and share price from 2012–17: In 2017, Coca-Cola delivered another year of declining sales. And the stock was up again. So nothing has changed. A company can’t keep reporting lower and lower profits and somehow see the stock price continue to go higher and higher. Eventually, you get absurd prices. Today, I’ll show you the group of investors who are causing these distorted prices… and a little-known trick to fade—or counter—this trend to find value in the market. The Rise of Index Investors Companies like Coca-Cola can see their share prices rise, despite falling earnings, because of a practice called indexing. An example of indexing is when you put your money in an S&P 500 Index fund, or exchange-traded fund (ETF). These funds aim to mimic the returns of the S&P 500 by buying all the shares in the index in the exact proportion they are held in the index. The fees are very low. And since most actively managed funds can’t beat the index, index funds have become a popular option. Popular may be an understatement. The Vanguard Group—one of the largest providers of index funds and ETFs—has $4.5 trillion under management. That’s no typo. Trillion, with a “T.” The top 10 index firms report $9.2 trillion in indexed assets. That’s about a third of the value of tradable shares in the S&P 500. And the inflow continues. And those inflows are creating distortions. You have a steady buyer sending a tsunami of money into index funds as well as a limited number of big stocks. Indexers don’t care if Coca-Cola is overvalued. If it is in the index, the index fund has to buy it. Period. Over the years, this creates odd effects on the pricing of those stocks in the index. Few do a better job of documenting these distortions than Murray Stahl, the chief investment officer and co-founder of Horizon Kinetics, a New York-based investment firm. Murray calls companies like Coca-Cola “revenue decliners.” In March 2017, Stahl warned that Coca-Cola was overvalued. He showed that sales and earnings had fallen since 2012. And yet the stock carried a premium valuation. “No one seems concerned that a highly caloric soft drink like Coca-Cola is losing market share to healthier alternatives,” he wrote. How to explain it? Coca-Cola is an index favorite. And the flood of money pouring into index funds gives stocks like Coca-Cola lots and lots of automatic buyers. I think it is a leading contributor to overvaluation. Where to Find Value Today Here’s a little-known secret of how S&P constructs its index: The focus is on the market cap, as indicated by the float. The float is the number of shares outstanding less shares held by insiders. Thus, the index overweights shares with low insider ownership, like Western Union. And it underweights shares with high insider ownership, such as Berkshire Hathaway. That’s the exact opposite of what a smart investor would do. Instead of piling into overvalued index funds, you should be attentive to the differences between companies. It may not feel like it because the indexers have done very well blindly betting on the S&P 500. But they are taking risks that will catch up with them eventually. In Bonner Private Portfolio, we continue to own firms that are either not in the S&P 500 or that are underweighted because of high insider ownership. That’s where we’re finding value. On the flip side, there is a steady supply of sellers of stocks not favored by indexes, as money flows away from the active managers who would typically hold such stocks and toward the indexers. The result is that you can find value in stocks not favored by the indexers. Now is a great time to be a stock picker. Regards,last_img read more