BP Tanker First to Ship LNG through Panama Canal

first_imgzoom The liquefied natural gas tanker British Merchant, owned by UK-based oil and gas major BP Plc, will be the first LNG tanker to transit the Expanded Panama Canal in late July, according to Bloomberg.Featuring 138,000 cbm, the tanker will start its journey from the Caribbean Port of Point Fortin, Trinidad and Tobago, where it is currently anchored, according to AIS data provided by Marine Traffic.The 75,059 dwt vessel was built by South Korea’s shipbuilder Samsung Heavy Industries in 2003.The Expanded Panama Canal is capable of serving the LNG carriers coming out of Trinidad and Tobago with destination Chile, as these vessels will now be able to go through the new waterway, saving hundreds of sea miles.The Panama Canal Authority estimated that the new canal could see about 20 million tons of LNG pass through it on an annual basis, equivalent to some 300 ships a year, Bloomberg writes.Panama Canal Administrator and CEO Jorge L. Quijano, earlier said that there are currently “170 reservations for Neopanamax ships, commitments of two new liner services to the Expanded Canal, and a reservation for the first LNG vessel.”The USD 5.25 billion canal’s locks are 70 feet wider and 18 feet deeper than those in the original canal, and they use less water due to water-savings basins that recycle 60 percent of the water used per transit.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

New website showcases joint activities of UN labour and agriculture agencies

6 June 2008Two United Nations agencies dealing with labour and agriculture today launched a new website designed to highlight the many areas in which they work together, including youth employment, safety and health and crisis management. The website: “Food, Agriculture and Decent Work” (www.fao-ilo.org) describes the cooperation and activities of the International Labour Organization (ILO) and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) in 10 major fields and provides links to related information sources. The site showcases work related to decent employment, child labour, youth employment, cooperatives, small and medium enterprises, rural workers, safety and health, crisis management, crops, fisheries and forestry, and labour statistics. The ILO seeks to promote opportunities for women and men to obtain decent and productive work in conditions of freedom, equity, security and human dignity. The goal of FAO is to help reduce hunger and rural poverty through the sustainable development of agriculture, rural areas and their natural resources.“Both organizations share a commitment to support people-centred, sustainable development and fair and inclusive globalization,” according to a news release issued by ILO. “A coordinated strategy is a critical option in order to complement and enhance the work currently being carried out by each organisation, respectively, on labour and agriculture and rural development and promote rural work,” the agency added. read more